How To Help Your Employees Embrace Change

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Employee Experience Pulse Check

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The COVID-19 pandemic and tech-dependency in a digital economy have compelled organizations to change the way they do business to stay relevant in a dynamic landscape. 

But while leaders get excited about change, employees often resist it, especially if perceived to significantly affect their jobs. 

People don’t fear change; they fear sudden change.

Simon Sinek

 

Why Do Employees Fear Change At Work?

The threat of change and the excess uncertainty it brings are very challenging for most workers. Restructuring, new leadership, and other organizational changes can lead to employees who are overly stressed, have less trust in their employers, and have a greater desire to find new jobs, according to a study by the American Psychological Association (APA). 

The pandemic has worsened employees’ feelings of insecurity about the new demands of work. Data from the LiveTiles Global Employee Experience Pulse Check 2021 shows that over a third of more than 7,000 employees in seven countries feel nervous about their job security, and about 37% are looking for a new job.

Leadership plays a critical role in successfully leading change. Ineffective leadership can trigger anxiety and conflict and make employees unwilling to adapt to new circumstances or ways of doing things. A Mckinsey study notes that 70 percent of complex, large-scale change programs fail to achieve their goals because of inadequate management support and lack of workplace engagement. 

Building A Work Environment That Thrives Amidst Change

“People don’t fear change; they fear sudden change. And great leadership with empathy can overcome any challenges and issues that arise with change programs,” Simon Sinek said in his Let’s Connect event. By approaching workplace change with empathy and compassion, leaders can better understand employees’ experiences and points of view and help them navigate the stages of change.

A Harvard Business Review article also emphasized the importance of empathetic leadership in helping organizations create smart, fast change. “Leadership as a behavior, not a position, has the capacity to meet the change challenge of today. There is a strong need to reconstruct the modern organization and create an environment that fosters more autonomy, participation, and leadership.”

Here are some steps leaders can take to help employees embrace change and see it as an opportunity to grow:

Engage and Involve Employees

Give your people a sense of control and ownership by inviting them into planning. For example, you can do a poll and invite employees to share their sentiments about reporting back to the office twice a week. This way, you’ll gain more insights into the support that your employees need and create a more strategic and informed plan for a return to the office. 

Communicate Clearly and Cultivate A Culture of Transparency 

Maintain honest and open communication with employees by letting them know how often you will update them as the change initiative unfolds—then commit to it. Share as much information as you can about the strategies and challenges. Let your employees understand what to expect and explain what will be different to help them prepare for the new work dynamics.

Having a great employee engagement platform, for example, will keep employees connected by allowing them to easily ask questions, ideate, and contribute to any processes of change. 

Upskill Employees and Prepare Them For New Opportunities

Educate, mentor, and provide the proper training that employees need to seamlessly ease into new processes. Make it a habit to do one-on-ones to check in on each employee, give them reassurance, get feedback, and find out how you can better support the employee to reach his or her new goals.

Strengthen Employee Resilience and Workplace Relationships

Organizational change will be more manageable if you keep your employees’ enthusiasm and optimism alive. Foster a sense of belonging in the workplace by investing in team-building activities that can help build community among employees. Prioritize health and well-being programs that help employees cope with stress and new ways of working. 

Actively empowering employees is the best way to get them on board in any organizational change. Listening to (and acting upon) their concerns can help navigate potential barriers to change that might happen during business and technology transformation processes or transitions.

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How To Optimize The Digital Workplace for Hybrid Work

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How To Optimize The Digital Workplace for Hybrid Work

The COVID-19 pandemic has compelled companies to reimagine the future of work.
Digital workplace

Employee Experience Pulse Check

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To excel in a post-pandemic era, organizations are moving to hybrid work—a blended model that combines remote work and office collaboration. 

 

According to The Accenture Future of Work Study 2021, 63% of high-growth companies worldwide have already adopted a “productivity anywhere” workforce model. More businesses are expected to follow suit, especially since today’s modern employees are seeking a workplace culture that lets them decide where they will do their best work.  

 

In its landmark LiveTiles Digital Workplace Trends 2021 report, the research emphasized how flexibility is now a currency more highly valued than salary. To attract and retain top talent, employers must offer some level of choice, increase flexibility, and help employees maintain the necessary balance between their personal lives and their jobs.

 

“A good salary is simply not enough… Employees want to feel they are making a difference beyond driving shareholder value, but also want opportunities for contributing to meaningful outcomes, personal growth, flexible working, and more,” the report said.

   

Digital Workplace: Employee Experience Is King

 

To build a digital workplace that supports a hybrid workforce, leaders must transform every aspect of the employee experience. They must prioritize new strategies to create a true work-from-anywhere capability that supports performance, culture, and connection. This includes personalized, digital workplace experiences that simplify employees’ workdays and help them become more productive and engaged.

 

“The Convenient. Enjoyable. Meaningful. These are the principles needed to guide all employees in a hybrid workplace design….This new way of working means whether you’re on the road, in the office, or at home, the level of experience needs to be consistent for all those collaborating,” said Tariq Moanah, Digital Product Lead responsible for Digital Workplace Experience with global financial services organization, Legal & General.



Digital Workplace Solutions That Empower The Hybrid Workforce

 

Here are some digital workplace best practices that leaders can build on to unleash the full potential of a hybrid workforce.



Leverage The Power Of Technology

 

Leaders must harness the right technology solutions to maintain connection and performance regardless of location. Bring everyone on board with the digital transformation. Gain a deeper understanding of the technology and processes that employees value most and work on collaboration tools that are needed to achieve a seamless digital experience.



Cultivate A Human-Centric, Empathetic Work Culture

 

Empathy, creativity, team building, and resilience — these are the essential human skills that will help leaders and their employees navigate the new hybrid world of work. Leaders must develop more empathetic, informal communication styles — those that encourage dialogue, listening, and feedback — to help employees cope with the uncertainties and constant changes.



Upskill Employees

 

Leaders must bring learning and innovation right into the heart of the digital workplace. They must scale investments in upskilling employees and provide them with the right training on new software and tools. Prioritizing one-on-one or small group training is crucial to ensuring a smooth and efficient transition.

 

To build a great digital workplace where hybrid workforces grow and thrive, the strategy needs to be employee-driven. A positive digital workplace leads to better employee experiences. These, in turn, will drive strategic business objectives like increased employee engagement, customer satisfaction and high levels of efficiency and collaboration. 



In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

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The employee communication app is the new employee newsletter, on steroids. Gone are the days when employees have to check their email inbox to learn about the new developments in the company. These days, employees expect an app to deliver relevant news and do much more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has compelled companies to reimagine the future of work.

Retention and Growth: Investing In Employees Is Good For Business

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Retention and Growth: Investing In Employees Is Good For Business

The COVID-19 pandemic brought about drastic changes in the workplace, redefining the employee experience. Most employers and employees were forced to quickly adapt with remote working technologies and maintain a dynamic culture. This meant more time at home with family but boundaries between home and work life are crossed, causing employee burnout.
Employee experience held with growth and retention

Employee Experience Pulse Check

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Without that defining line, more than one third of employees are actually taking in more work than the previous year. And for more than 1 of 10 employees, this amounts to over 16 hours per week!

 

Another contributing factor to the increased employee attrition is the employee’s dissatisfaction with the pace of their career development. People have been working hard, which may come with expectations, yet there are no foreseeable opportunities for advancement.

 

Not Investing In Human Capital Will Hurt Your Business

 

Employees play a huge role in every company’s success. So every aspect of it, from operations to company culture, is tremendously impacted when an employee leaves. Turnovers dampen morale, negatively affecting performance and productivity. Present employees who will take on the added responsibilities left behind by their co-worker may also feel less motivated and satisfied with work. There is also an opportunity cost associated with losing senior employees, who have the institutional knowledge, skills, and relationships.

 

Add in the financial cost of recruiting and training replacement workers which costs 33% of an employee’s salary, as determined in our LiveTiles Digital Workplace Trends 2021 study. It also affects quality of work as it takes time for the new hire to be up to speed and at par with their predecessor.

 

It’s understandable that training costs were the first to be cut off in your company’s budget during this crisis but it is now time to reinvest in people. Efforts to retain and nurture valuable talent is the key differentiator in today’s competitive job market as “employee retention percentage of your company is directly related to its productivity and growth.”



What You Can Do To Boost Retention Rates

 

Formal employee onboarding programs can increase employee retention by 25%. Host opportunities to welcome new hires before their first day to get them started on the right foot. These can be pocket events where they can complete pre-joining processes and interact with teammates, or welcome them with personalized resources.

 

Offer employee development programs for upskilling and reskilling as part of the compensation package. Make in-house training programs, knowledge transfer sessions, mentorship programs, on-demand learning opportunities, and participation in conferences and industry events available to facilitate growth. These activities keep everyone up-to-date with the latest trends and best practices as well as encourage critical and innovative thinking.

 

Develop good relationships with the people you work with. Organize social events outside working hours to improve employee engagement through dinners, team building activities, company-wide themed celebrations, and others.

 

Retain flexible or hybrid working arrangements. High wages are not enough to keep top talent anymore. Employees today are looking for more choices on how, when, and where they can do their work. By providing these options, businesses allow workers to retain their work-life balance and show that they trust them.

 

Doing any of these deliberate strategies can foster loyalty and increased engagement as well as provide managers and/or human resource personnel the opportunity to learn their colleagues strengths, weaknesses, and needs. Furthermore, your company is now future-ready with a talent pool of well-trained, confident, and promotable workers.

 

Improving your company’s comprehensive employee retention program through employee experience management, with a thrust on learning and development programs plus overall human capital management, is a worthy investment for both you and your employees.



In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

The COVID-19 pandemic brought about drastic changes in the workplace, redefining the employee experience. Most employers and employees were forced to quickly adapt with remote working technologies and maintain a dynamic culture. This meant more time at home with family but boundaries between home and work life are crossed, causing employee burnout.
In the 2010s, a digital employee experience was nice-to-have. By the time the new decade came in, it became a must-have. This has become more apparent as we end 2021, after nearly two years of an accelerated shift into the digital workplace.
In October 2021, the World Economic Forum declared: “empathy has risen to the top of the board’s agenda”.

Three Ways to Improve Employee Experience in 2022

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Three Ways to Improve Employee Experience in 2022

In the 2010s, a digital employee experience was nice-to-have. By the time the new decade came in, it became a must-have. This has become more apparent as we end 2021, after nearly two years of an accelerated shift into the digital workplace.
Digital employee experience

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

James Robertson, founder of Australia-based consultancy Step Two, defined digital employee experience as the “sum total of digital interactions within the work environment”. This was noted by LiveTiles in its 2020 Digital Workplace Experience report, which acknowledged the need for organizations “to craft a consistent, user-centered and personalized experience of workplace technology that helps employees with their working day.”

 

For LiveTiles, ​​employee experience (EX) is the emotional connection that emerges from

the sum of an employees’ total experience with an organization. A great digital employee experience must then let employees feel deeply connected and engaged to a company’s purpose, brand and vision. This is what enables employees to perform at their best, leading them to have healthy experiences at work and in their personal endeavors. 

 

This shows that digital employee experience is no longer a mere transfer of workplace interactions to online platforms. Today, it is a vital component to keep all people in an organization engaged. 

 

To prepare for the coming year, we’ve rounded up three ways to help organizations improve their employee experience:

 


1. Automate mundane tasks when possible 

In the 2020 Digital Workplace Experience report, LiveTiles noted a survey by Gartner that found 7 out of 10 white-collar workers would be interacting with chatbots on a regular basis by 2022. These bots can play a wide array of functions, from simple note-taking to more intelligent tasks like responding to some of the most basic queries a regular staff may have to a human resource officer. 

 

These features can optimize the tasks of some of the most in-demand members of a company, allowing everyone to function and deliver their duties without the nagging feeling that one has left some mundane work undone. This also reinforces the need for companies to implement and improve AI-enabled features of their digital employee experience. It also underscores another insight from the report: the need for the digital employee experience to be “people-centered”. 

 


2. Keep digital tools accessible

As ordinary, taxing work is transferred to automated solutions, employees would now have the chance to focus on more productive, collaborative, or meaningful work. This is especially helpful now that work-from-home arrangements are becoming more common. Companies must now ensure that the digital employee experience is accessible and enjoyed whenever and wherever an employee may be. A Gartner report had already suggested 48 percent of employees are expected to continue working from home even after the pandemic. 

 

With hybrid working conditions expected to be the new model of work, a digital employee experience that allows the entire workforce to thrive in such a set-up would be the new standard from organizations. 



3. Introduce digital solutions in an all-in-one platform

This need for accessibility and privacy also highlights the benefit of bringing different parts of the digital employee experience into a single platform. Much like how most would want their closets to look—organized and well-labeled—most would also want a cohesive digital work platform. 

 

PepsiCo, the multinational beverage company, is one of the organizations that recently implemented such a move, allowing all the members of its company to access apps and collaboration sites relevant to their tasks in a single online space. Imagine if all of the functions required in a job are accessible from wherever the employee spends most of their time online (such as Teams, an employee app, or SharePoint); there would be no need to constantly switch apps and keep track of endless notifications. 

 

It is worth noting, however, that these upgrades, no matter how shiny and new, will remain unattractive to employees when implemented without their needs in mind. Practicing “active” listening, and crafting features that set employees up for success, will be the best tools to deliver the best digital employee experience



In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

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Nearly two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, it is clear that the new work dynamics are having profound consequences for employee experience.
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Why Empathy Matters

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Why Empathy Matters

In October 2021, the World Economic Forum declared: “empathy has risen to the top of the board’s agenda”.
Why empathy matters in the workplace

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

No longer is a hip and stylish office, or a well-equipped pantry enough to improve workplace engagement. Almost overnight, managers have become the frontliners in delivering the needs of employees. And with such demands, competence no longer means just delivering tasks on time or producing great results. Being competent now also means being empathetic.

 

A survey conducted by Catalyst revealed, six out of ten employees with highly empathetic senior leaders report being more innovative at work compared to one out of ten for those with less empathetic senior leaders.

 

The pandemic has forced businesses to stop treating employees as “replaceable” parts of their organizations. In fact, a shift to a more “empathetic organizational culture” is one of the main themes that emerged in research on digital employee experience in the latest Digital Workplace Trends report.

 

 

But what is empathy anyway?

 

Outside of work, empathy means having the ability to connect or relate with the feelings of another. At work, this now means having employers and co-workers who can understand that their peers are more than just the person who turns up for work.

 

In a Fortune article, Vanessa Ferguson, senior vice president of people and experience at LiveTiles, shared how the company witnessed what this meant firsthand in the first few weeks of the pandemic.

 

“When we originally shifted to working from home, it was very evident that some people had a home office setup, good internet connectivity, and either no kids or their kids were being looked after by a relative. Then there were people who were just really not able to adjust. We needed to get in and help them,” Ferguson said.

 

This meant reaching out and listening to what employees had to say. New employee engagement platforms like Reach allowed people to seamlessly perform their tasks even outside of the workplace with its streamlined communication process. By giving employees a chance and a platform to air their needs, the company was able to craft a better support system as lockdowns continued and circumstances varied across regions.

 

Unfortunately, this empathetic approach in leadership is not the norm. A survey by the Center for Creative Leadership reveals that not everyone is naturally empathetic, but it can be learned. “Active listening” and making a “conscious choice of the most appropriate verbal and non-verbal language” in the workplace are some of the steps business leaders may take to inculcate a more empathetic environment.

 

 

How Empathy Can Affect Workplace Culture

 

The same survey by the Center for Creative Leadership also added: “empathetic leaders are assets to organizations, in part, because they are able to effectively build and maintain relationships—a critical part of leading organizations anywhere in the world.” With social issues continuing to hound the news cycle—from racism to climate—change, an empathetic leader at work is definitely a welcome reprieve for employees.

 

Such a set-up also gives workers a better environment to deliver their tasks effectively. Empathetic leaders may spell a world of difference to the lives of workers, as they feel more supported to become more than just members of the workplace. After all, World Economic Forum has already said: mental health, stress, and burnout are now perceived as responsibilities of the organization. The failure to deploy empathy means less innovation, lower engagement, and reduced loyalty.”

 

In the post-pandemic workplace, kindness is now a highly valued human skill.

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

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How To Make The Most Out Of Employee Check-Ins

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How To Make The Most Out Of Employee Check-Ins

Nearly two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, it is clear that the new work dynamics are having profound consequences for employee experience.
Employee check-ins

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

Nearly two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, it is clear that the new work dynamics are having profound consequences for employee experience. And as unprecedented conditions drag on, more employees are feeling disconnected with their work, leaders, and company culture.

 

Findings from the first LiveTiles Global Employee Experience Pulse Check 2021 show how interactions between employees and employers plunged amid the pandemic. Results consistently reveal that high proportions of employees are stressed, disconnected, and dissatisfied. For example, 43% of 7,000 employees in seven countries surveyed have issues with feeling ignored and invisible.

 

More troubling is the fact that younger workers are feeling disenchanted, disengaged, and excluded because of weaker team connections. According to the same survey, only 18% of 24- to 35-year-olds fully agree they feel valued at work, and 80% are not satisfied with their connection to their workplace’s organizational culture.

 

 

Why Do Check-ins Matter?

 

A recent Harvard Business Review article emphasized how the element of connection has the greatest power to boost workplace engagement in any company. Here is where regular check-ins help build strong relationships between leaders and employees and foster a culture that’s centered on transparency and support.

 

Empathetic leadership is key to effective communication in the workplace. Leaders should go beyond constantly monitoring how employees reach their goals at work. Instead, they must get to know their employees on a more authentic, human level.

 

In his “Let’s Connect” event with LiveTiles, bestselling author Simon Sinek pointed out that leaders must actively listen to the needs and concerns of employees so they can build trust and cultivate a sense of belonging in the workplace.

 

“There’s an opportunity to teach the skills of leadership, things like listening and empathy, how to have an effective confrontation, how to give and receive feedback, how to have difficult conversations, how to check-in. These are all skills,” he said.

 

“And when you find that you have robust leadership training, middle management is much better equipped to make people feel like they’re a part of something and feel included, seen, heard, and understood. Because they are!”

 

 

What Can Leaders Do To Better Connect With Their Employees?

 

Here are some steps that leaders can take to achieve meaningful check-ins with employees.

 

Be Prepared

 

Plan ahead and let the employee participate in deciding what to talk about during the one-on-one meeting. Keep it short and be clear about expectations. Build rapport by taking a few minutes to talk about things that are unrelated to work.

 

Facilitate A More Candid Check-In

 

Be inquisitive and understand the employee on a more personal level. Instead of just asking how the employee is doing, ask more specific questions like “How are you holding up mentally and emotionally?” or “What is the biggest challenge you are facing working from home?” Find out how employees are coping and taking care of themselves during the pandemic.

 

Make Your Employee Feel That Checking-in Is About Collaboration

 

Find out what you can specifically do for employees to help them succeed at work. Ask them, “Where do you need support?” Let them know that it’s about working together to make work more enjoyable and productive.

 

Be Present

 

Spend more time listening and less time talking. Remove anything that may cause distractions during the check-in. This way, you’ll make your employee feel that you are paying close attention and that you care about them.

 

Create A Safe Space To Share Concerns

 

Ask employees about their priority projects and what they are most uncertain about at work. Be open and honest, so that you can be someone they can trust to share their struggles and work-related issues. Maximize opportunities to keep them updated about the organization’s direction, strategy, and goals.

 

 

Leaders can turn check-ins into powerful conversations that strengthen workplace relationships. Real, effective check-ins provide meaning in the work by empowering employees to make connections that are built on mutual honesty, respect, and trust.

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

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We are honoured to be a part of the Australian Financial Review’s Fast 100 list. This would not have been possible without our customers. And kudos to the global LiveTiles team who keep elevating our belief, making great employee experiences, an essential part of today’s culture-driven, modern workplace. Mere words are not enough.
Thousands of people across the world joined the LiveTiles Let’s Connect virtual event featuring visionary thought leader and bestselling author Simon Sinek.

Simon Sinek Event Recap

Simon Sinek helps shape our understanding of great Employee Experience (EX)

By Peter Nguyen-Brown

Thousands of people across the world joined the LiveTiles Let’s Connect virtual event featuring visionary thought leader and bestselling author Simon Sinek.

The theme for the event was employee experience – and there is no wonder why so many people tuned in to hear Simon tackle the hard-hitting questions given the size and rate of change transforming the way we work and live.

Over the past year, only 20% of the global workforce felt engaged [1] and 37% of employees said they were over-demanded during the pandemic [2], which is alarming considering we spend almost one third of our life at work.

Sinek proved he was up for the challenge, taking questions from a diverse range of people from all walks of life including nurses working in COVID wards, hospitality workers, professionals from the corporate sector and not-for-profits, students in quarantine on remote islands and everything in between.

In this article, I share the nuggets of gold that will help you transform the way you think and feel about work and lead your team and your broader company into an era of a better working world.

In my closing commentary from the Simon Sinek event, I noted what we see as the 5 key pillars of EX based on our knowledge of the topic and from everything we heard, and I’ve included a summary of this below. Over the coming weeks we’ll be sharing further insights, particularly in relation to each of the pillars of EX including Connection, Engagement, Well-being, Performance and Inspiration.

 

The 5 pillars of employee experience by LiveTiles


Devise and implement metrics to measure employee experience


In simple terms, at LiveTiles we see Employee Experience as the strength of emotional connection that emerges from the experience between a person and their employer. Great Employee Experience is where employees are deeply connected and engaged to a company’s purpose, brand, values and vision, and where employees are enabled to perform at their best and are happy and healthy at work and in life – and it’s incredibly important to devise a set of metrics to measure it.

 

One of the main reasons that most companies do not measure employee experience is not because it’s unmeasurable, but because it’s difficult to do. Instead, companies tend to stick to the tangibles and measure widgets, sales numbers, revenues, profit and market share.

 

However, companies that fail to take steps to understand and measure employee experience over the longer term will be the ones that suffer. Research has shown that sustainable long-term success is intrinsically linked to organisations that focus on culture, trust, connectivity and engagement – all the foundations of great employee experience.


Gradual change trumps a Band-Aid

People don’t fear change, they fear sudden change. And great leadership with empathy can overcome any challenges and issues that arise with change programs.

 

Instead of giving your employees a PowerPoint presentation that talks about why this change is necessary, leaders should take the time to understand their experience and points of view. And if there are concerns it is important to offer additional training, extend handholding programs, offer a course to take them on the change journey rather than just thrusting it upon them.

 

It is also important to recognise and accept that change happens at different paces for different people. We cannot expect or force people to embrace and adopt things at the same time.


Human connection on virtual platforms requires ‘much more work’

In a virtual world we must be more prescriptive, and we must work harder on building trust and connectivity with our work colleagues. The famous violinist Isaac Stern said, “music is what happens between the notes” – and at work, trust is built between the meetings.

 

In a virtual world we must purposely create those engagements and provide spaces where you don’t talk about work and focus on the human elements of a person’s life.

 

The telephone is also an underrated channel for connectivity. We are truly engaged on the phone and if somebody is distracted, we can say, ‘are you there?’ So, pick up the phone, call your team members sporadically and often, and do not wait for things to go wrong to check in.


There are no such things as ‘soft skills’

 

We tend to talk about hard skills and soft skills as opposites that are working against each other when in fact they work together in concert.

We should be teaching hard skills (the skills you need to do your job) and human skills (the way to be a good person, a good leader) together and hold them as equally important qualities.

 

As it turns out when we teach people those human skills, not only does it benefit the employee in how they relate with people at work, it also benefits them in how they relate with people in life and they become better human beings.

 

People in general want to be recognised for being a human being, not just a cog in a machine. The more skills we can give them to ensure they are seen, heard and understood, pays dividends for the company, the employee and for society as a whole.


Honesty, vulnerability and transparency are key

 

Regular, informal and consistent check-ins and feedback are important. You can still have the annual reviews, but ongoing connectivity is valuable. A simple question such as “How are you?” can open an honest dialogue and give context to how people are performing at work – and better still, how you can help them to be the best version of themselves.

 

It’s important for leaders to know that you don’t always need to be tough, positive and have all the answers.

 

Your vulnerability and honestly provides your team and emerging leaders with the permission to do the same.

 

We can’t wait to continue our journey with passionate EX people in the industry, share our joint thoughts and learnings, and ensure that great EX can thrive in the workplace!

Peter Nguyen-Brown

Co-Founder & CXO LiveTiles


[1] Gallup, 2020, Employee Engagement and Performance Report

[2] Microsoft, 2021, The Work Trend Index