5 Leadership Skills Managers Need in today’s Digital Workplace

Blog

5 Leadership Skills Managers Need in today’s Digital Workplace

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

“Business as usual” has taken on a new meaning in the fast-moving dynamics of the modern workplace. Digital technology now equips companies of all sizes with the means to continue operations in a remote or hybrid set-up while allowing colleagues to efficiently collaborate, have more time for personal growth, and  avoid the stress of a daily commute.


Much like the traditional or physical workplace, it is crucial to maintain internal communications and employee engagement for distributed teams. More so if you are a company like Entain, a fast-growing global sports betting, gaming, and interactive entertainment group that employs over 24,000 people in more than 20 countries working across multiple brands.


The decision to replace their existing employee intranet platform and go digital-first resulted in the Entain.me employee experience platform, which is built around the idea of microservices.


The LiveTiles platform now allows for the integration not only of Microsoft 365, Yammer, and Teams—each essential to the company’s operations—but other features like a connection to ServiceNow helpdesk and HR services.


Unique Challenges of the Digital Workplace


While having the right tools and systems are important, management may come across unique challenges in the digital workplace, such as:


  • Colleagues taking time to adapt to the new work culture
  • New tools or workflows with steep learning curves that may affect productivity
  • Digital etiquette problems arising from teams working in different time zones, such as sending emails after office hours or being expected to reply right away
  • People unable to disengage from work and experiencing burnout

To address these concerns, we need digital workplace leaders capable of recreating the strong social connections that face-to-face interaction does. However, as mentioned by bestselling author Simon Sinek during his Let’s Connect Event with LiveTiles, people must realize that it requires hard work to create meaningful human connections virtually


Five key leadership skills for digital workplace managers


To help managers better adapt to the demands of today’s workplace, Harvard Business School Online identifies these key leadership skills:


1 Emotional Intelligence (EI) is the ability to recognize, understand, and manage one’s emotional state and that of others. Leaders with high EI are able to promote an open and inclusive culture where people are not afraid of making mistakes and are motivated to bring their whole selves to work.


They are also high on empathy and genuine care, asking “How are you?” with keen interest to get a pulse and identify how they can support their people. EI is a key skill that influences your ability to communicate, motivate others, delegate tasks, and remain flexible under pressure.


2 Communication. Email, instant messaging, social media and the like have overtaken face-to-face interaction in the remote work setup. While digital tools give a sense of community, people can easily feel ignored and/or misunderstood.


Leaders need to know the best communication platform to use and adapt their communication styles for different audiences and situations. In addition, they must know how to listen actively, be open and transparent, and ask questions that spark genuine discussion. They must be especially mindful of their tone of voice and body language—including during video calls.


3 Motivation. Rather than telling others what to do or micromanaging tasks, good leaders empower employees to do what they were hired for. This involves creating a culture of trust, which is built by giving positive feedback in those moments between meetings.


Managers should use whatever digital tools at their disposal to show empathy and support open communication within the team. On top of that, stay purpose-driven and keep an eye out for employee growth opportunities. This strategy will improve overall team performance and also free up time for essential leadership tasks.


4 Self-awareness. Honest reflection and self-assessment can help leaders gain a deeper understanding of their strengths and weaknesses, which can sometimes be amplified in a digital work setup. Being self-aware will allow them to recognize opportunities and nip potential problems in the bud. 

Seek honest feedback and act on these to realize your full leadership potential.


Don’t be afraid to ask for training that will better equip you for your tasks.


5 Resilience. When managing a remote team, possibly across different time zones, things may not always go according to plan. Thus leaders must learn to stay flexible and resilient under pressure, knowing how to quickly adapt to change and guide their team to new courses of action. It also pays to see the opportunities in the situation, as having a wide network will allow you to tap more resources.


Strategies to build resilience continuously striving to learn and improve yourself and your team, retaining your sense of purpose, and developing strong relationships with friends, colleagues, and mentors that you can rely upon when the need arises.


In the digital age, leaders need to inspire, engage and lead with optimism. Today’s work environment may be dynamic and unpredictable, but armed with these skills managers can develop a genuinely humane brand of leadership, create a strong workplace culture, and thrive in their roles as motivators, mentors, and visionaries.

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

In 2018, Alex Edmans, Professor of Finance at London Business School, estimated that talents today would only want to work for purpose-driven firms.
The employee communication app is the new employee newsletter, on steroids. Gone are the days when employees have to check their email inbox to learn about the new developments in the company. These days, employees expect an app to deliver relevant news and do much more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has compelled companies to reimagine the future of work.

Passion Over Profit: Why Purpose-Driven Business is Good Business

Blog

Passion Over Profit: Why Purpose-Driven Business is Good Business

In 2018, Alex Edmans, Professor of Finance at London Business School, estimated that talents today would only want to work for purpose-driven firms.
Digital workplace and passion for the job

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

He predicted that in a decade, “purpose” would be ingrained in corporate plans. Two years later, this insight is front and center of organizations’ growth strategies. 

 

With the pandemic upending norms and the rise of the digital workplace, organizations are also recalibrating workflow. With employees now more reflective of “why” they work, businesses are likewise reflecting, and for good reason. In a Livetiles event, Simon Sinek said that talking about “where you’re coming from, and what your belief is,” makes people perk up. “People become much more open to [a company’s] message when they understand the reason behind its existence,” he added. Gone are the days when profit was the main business driver. 



Shareholder value is no longer everything’

In 2019, the Business Roundtable, an association of chief executives of some of the US’ top companies, boldly proclaimed: shareholder value is no longer everything. From Apple’s Tim Cook, to Mattel’s Ynon Kreiz, CEOs agreed that companies must now bring more value to customers and employees alike. They agreed business practices must have the environment in mind, as they embrace “sustainable practices” and “foster diversity and inclusion, dignity and respect”. 

 

Outdoor clothing brand Patagonia is one of the leading purpose-driven brands. In 2018, the brand tweaked its company mission, now focused on building a business to save our planet. It is a bold statement that has reaped benefits and one they back up with action. Their ‘care and repair’ programs for instance promote longer product life and they regularly fund environmental protection as they recently did from their Black Friday profits.



More companies helped combat climate change in 2021

For the past 18 months, it is apparent that the pandemic has served as a catalyst for more to do the same. 2021 saw a record number of companies pledging significant efforts in their bid to help curb the effects of climate change. There are now more companies that have signed up for the Science-Based Targets Initiative (SBTI) compared to 2020, according to a report by The Guardian. SBTI, as its name suggests, helps companies calculate emissions targets in line with the Paris Agreement goals. 

 

Tech giant Microsoft pledged to be “carbon negative” by 2030. Car manufacturer GM Motors said it would be carbon neutral by 2040, and only sell vehicles that produce zero emissions by 2035. A representative from SBTI has said: “science-based target setting is becoming standard practice”. 



Purpose-driven business is good business

Naysayers may think being purpose-driven is only good as a marketing strategy. But numbers have proven that having a strong “why” means good business too. 

 

New York-based communications agency Zeno Group found that consumers now prefer to purchase from purpose-driven businesses, and are even more likely to recommend brands with such messaging to friends and family. The agency, which surveyed 8,000 consumers in eight markets from Europe to Southeast Asia, also learned 8 out of 10 believe companies should only turn a profit if they deliver a positive impact. 

 

The need for strong messaging on brand purpose also translates internally. Gallup found an increase in employee engagement when employees find more purpose and meaning in their work. This translates to a 23% increase in profitability, 81% less absenteeism, and 43% lower turnover among employees. There is also the undeniably strong pull-factor to attract talent.

 

Sinek underscored the same belief in the LiveTiles event: “Starting with ‘why’ really is about idealism. It’s about purpose, cause, or belief that is bigger than the product you make.” The challenge now for businesses is to find a compelling answer to their “why”, one that will help them not just survive, but thrive during these unprecedented times. 

 

As the past few months have proven, for a business to prosper in this new era, companies need to deliver not just great products but find (and communicate) the compelling reason why they make them.



In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

The COVID-19 pandemic brought about drastic changes in the workplace, redefining the employee experience. Most employers and employees were forced to quickly adapt with remote working technologies and maintain a dynamic culture. This meant more time at home with family but boundaries between home and work life are crossed, causing employee burnout.
In the 2010s, a digital employee experience was nice-to-have. By the time the new decade came in, it became a must-have. This has become more apparent as we end 2021, after nearly two years of an accelerated shift into the digital workplace.
In October 2021, the World Economic Forum declared: “empathy has risen to the top of the board’s agenda”.

Why Employee Communication Apps Are So Effective

Blog

Why Employee Communication Apps Are So Effective

The employee communication app is the new employee newsletter, on steroids. Gone are the days when employees have to check their email inbox to learn about the new developments in the company. These days, employees expect an app to deliver relevant news and do much more.
Employee communication app

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

The employee communication app is the new employee newsletter, on steroids. Gone are the days when employees have to check their email inbox to learn about the new developments in the company. These days, employees expect an app to deliver relevant news and do much more. 

 

The Livetiles Employee Communication report defines an employee communication app as the app used for communication and collaboration, allowing every member of an organization to stay informed, engaged, and productive. Ideally it is mobile-first and any member of the company from— from the boardroom to the lunchroon—can access essential and personalized news anytime, anywhere.

 

Optimizing the functions and features of the old office setting into a platform that’s accessible online is one of the many ways organizations can deliver a better employee experience. Below, we share some of the many benefits of this approach in the modern workplace. 



One platform for every kind of digital employee 

A WillisTowersWatson survey revealed that 52 percent of employees have reported high to moderate anxiety (while 66 percent reported distraction from the job at hand) when their employers made changes during the pandemic. One way to ensure a smoother transition through change for all is by providing an employee communication app that’s accessible to any employee, anytime, anywhere.

With many businesses adopting a hybrid work set-up, employees would want a single platform to access anything they may need from the company—from answers about their benefits to a one-on-one session with a supervisor. However, companies must recognize that such applications should also be flexible enough to meet the needs of different employees whether in the office, warehouse, or frontline. Format and content should be tailored to help them do their jobs better (and safer) while promoting a work culture based on social connection and inclusion.



Instant feedback

Such an app may also be a chance for an organization to get a better understanding of their employees. Whereas before, organizations would have to rely on occasional employee surveys and insights from managers to check the pulse of the workforce, an employee communication app can provide data that will show pain points of the company, in real-time. 

 

The Deloitte Tech Trends 2021 report had already noted: “[Digital workplace] tools can help employers gain insights ranging from individual employee performance to team-level productivity to companywide morale, enabling them to identify patterns and make predictions”.

 

For example, the time staff open the app can give employers insight if their employees are most productive in the morning or at night, which may be beneficial the next time they review office hours. Meanwhile, an app that has content, whether video or text, about work benefits, may give employers a peek at which offerings are the ones employees are most interested in. 

 

Collaboration in real time

The same app can now also serve as the digital lab to seed, crowdsource or cultivate ideas, giving managers and executives plenty of inspiration for innovation with real-time collaboration. The same Deloitte report emphasized this, saying the digital workplace had democratized “formerly privileged exchanges of ideas”. With the entire workforce now online and accessible to anyone in the company, the next best product or innovation can now come from anywhere too.

 

At the end of the day, the employee communication app must be centered on the needs of the employee. As a WillisTowersWatson survey revealed, a better employee experience will only be possible with a plan that is technology-enabled and integrated with an organization’s business strategy. Such a plan would drive engagement, employee wellbeing, productivity, and in turn, overall business performance. 

 

An employee communication app may be equipped with high-tech features, and even designed by an award-winning team, but if it is not what the employee needs, it is at risk of being irrelevant and unused. 

 

As Gallup said: “​​Today’s employee is a consumer of the workplace. A tech tool that allows them to do their best at work—therefore highlighting their purpose—is the one that they will use.”



In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

Nearly two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, it is clear that the new work dynamics are having profound consequences for employee experience.
Just like in our personal connections, trust is the foundation of a good work environment. But as our individual experiences show, it takes hard work to develop it.
Since April 2021, a record 19 million employees in the U.S. have quit their jobs, while many others are thinking of doing the same.

Here’s How To Build and Measure Trust in the Workplace

Blog

Here’s How To Build and Measure Trust in the Workplace

Just like in our personal connections, trust is the foundation of a good work environment. But as our individual experiences show, it takes hard work to develop it.
Building trust in the workplace

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

In his Let’s Connect Event with Livetiles, bestselling author Simon Sinek dared listeners to add another layer when tackling trust in the workplace.  “We tend to measure the things that are easy to measure: numbers, revenues, profits, just because it’s easy. But we can do better. We need to measure things like trust and culture and leadership,“ he said. 

 

This is a tall order, as according to the new Edelman Trust Barometer—a survey of 33,000 people in 28 countries—one in three people don’t trust their employer.

 

The pandemic has made trust-building more challenging. There are still a number of employees who find virtual calls and chat groups a hurdle, thus keeping organizations on their toes on how to best mimic the warmth and connection members feel in meeting rooms pre-pandemic. 

 

“It requires much more work to create those human connections virtually. The famous violinist, Isaac Stern, said ‘Music is what happens between the notes’. Well at work, trust is what’s built between the meetings,” according to Sinek. 

 

With in-person meetings happening few and far between, business leaders are faced with the unique challenge of building and nurturing trust in their digital workplaces. On top of this, measuring trust adds another layer of difficulty. 

 

Fortunately, a number of experts have shared some insights on how to tackle these two. After all, just as numbers are evaluated at work, it’s already been proven that what is measured can be managed. 



What Experts Say 

Paul J. Zak, founding director of the Center for Neuroeconomics Studies and a professor at Claremont Graduate University, conducted experiments for a decade to track the brain activity of people while they are at work. In the process, he found that the moment a person trusts another, a person’s brain tends to have higher oxytocin levels, the hormone related to a person’s social skills. 

 

With this insight, Zak recommended organizations to start with the basics of good leadership in building trust in their workplace. In a Harvard Business Review article, Zak said recognizing hard work, especially in a public setting, not only inspires the receiver of praise, but also those surrounding him. It motivates the one being recognized to do better, and in turn, allows others to see what constitutes excellent work. 

 

Such practice is especially helpful during the pandemic. Even before, a “good job” remark from a superior had already done wonders in making someone’s day in the office. Imagine how it can boost someone’s day when they are working alone at home. Digital workplace solutions that allow these activities to happen give employees a boost in morale—making them feel that no matter where they may be, their hard work is seen. 

 

The rewards of nurturing such activity can be seen when employees start working together. In another Harvard Business Review article, academic Teresa Amabile revealed employees report to be “happier” when they work on a project. So when employees now start working with others who have done great work in the past, it allows them to build bridges and trust the strengths of another. Amabile also found that employees tend to report having a more fulfilling work day when accomplishing a purposeful goal. 

 

Complement that amiable work environment with good management skills, and an organization can now expect results to be delivered by the employees. Olivier Serrat, former head of knowledge management at the Asian Development Bank, said that accomplishments will be the best determinator of one’s credibility. 

 

Allowing employees to succeed in their goals by providing them easy access to the components that let them thrive—from trustworthy colleagues to helpful tools—gives them a chance to trust the organization too. Their accomplishments at work will now be one of the best gauges to measure if an organization has a high level of trust. 

 

This shows that empowering workers and treating them like capable employees allows them to grow in a high-trust organization. 



In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

Employee experience is coming into focus for many organizations and is emerging as a major priority for HR teams who want to build a better and more sustainable
Workplace culture is a powerful tool in creating strong connections and improving employee experience, with the digital workplace helping.
Seven countries, seven thousand employees, provocative results. The first global EX report reveals the massive generational and technological gaps in today’s modern workplace.

How to Prevent Employee Burnout

Blog

How to Prevent Employee Burnout

Since April 2021, a record 19 million employees in the U.S. have quit their jobs, while many others are thinking of doing the same.
Employee burnout

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

In a follow-up survey of one thousand resignees, 40% cited burnout as their top reason for leaving. 

 

At the end of the day, burnout is bad for employees and bad for the bottom line. Take time to learn its six main causes so that you can design workplace solutions that promote employee wellbeing and avert further disruption.

 

 

The Six Biggest Causes of Burnout

 

Excessive workload. Our own global survey (of more than 7’000 employees across seven countries) reveals that 47% of employees are either “fed up”, “stressed” or “exhausted” at work. Help employees better manage their workloads by identifying low-priority goals, and providing more support for sudden workplace changes. You may also consider implementing other measures such as a four-day workweek.

 

Perceived lack of control. Being micromanaged is de-motivating for employees, whereas autonomy positively affects well-being. Build trust and empower employees to determine their best ways of working. Offer them more choice over how, where, or when a task can be accomplished. 

 

Lack of recognition. The Global Employee Experience Pulse Check 2021 shows that only 23% of employees are completely satisfied with the recognition they receive. Pay people what they’re worth, but also let them know that their work is seen and appreciated by both managers and colleagues. Don’t just focus on top contributors, which can foster envy and unhealthy competition. 

 

Poor relationships. Social connection is a greater challenge now with the digital workplace. Give employees opportunities to connect by building a more inclusive culture, and celebrate who they are outside the context of work. You may consider investing in an employee app or encouraging them to volunteer for causes of shared interest.

 

Lack of fairness. People who feel unfairly treated will lack motivation, or worse, smolder with resentment. While it would be impossible to eliminate every perceived slight and grievance, companies can provide early-warning systems to safely report and resolve these issues. Give employees a voice and be relentless in eliminating bias and discrimination. 

 

Values mismatch. When personal values align with company values, this leads to greater motivation and well-being. But where the opposite is true, this can lead to burnout. Companies can either hire people who align more with their values, or stand up for the values that they espouse. For employees, it may mean looking for an employer who truly walks the talk or empowers their people to pursue their sense of purpose in the workplace.

 

 

Invest in a More Fulfilling Employee Experience

 

To prevent burnout and attrition, it pays to design an employee experience that meets today’s demands for workplace autonomy and flexibility. Here are a few tips that may help you.

 

Prioritize human-centric design. Today’s employees want pay, benefits, and perks. But they also want to feel valued by their companies and managers. “Young people now value flexibility more than salary,” says Paul Conneally, head of global communications at LiveTiles. “This is not just about office versus home working models, but a culture that is focused more on performance than productivity, on outcomes rather than outputs.”

 

Use tech for good. Tech has undoubtedly made work faster and more efficient. But rather than focusing solely on productivity, use it to build healthy connections by promoting face-to-face collaboration and social interactions. “Technology needs to improve experience, not make it worse,” says Conneally. “Businesses need to ensure their ‘digital workplace‘ reduces employee frustration, drives efficiency and decreases the number of systems employees have to access.” 

 

Encourage employee communication. Establish a good system of feedback and empower the employee voice. Embrace the power of dialogue and make sure to actively listen—and resolve—your employees’ needs. As Simon Sinek said at the “Let’s Connect” virtual event, “People want to feel seen, heard and understood. They want to be recognized for being a human being, not just a cog in a machine.” By giving them the skills to make them feel seen, heard and understood, you allow them to do the same for others.

 

By making a concerted effort to better understand the causes of burnout and taking meaningful action to address these, companies could gain the advantage in attracting, developing, and retaining the talent they need in the post-pandemic era.



In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

New global survey rings the alarm bell for employers to embrace Gen Z if they are to successfully retain and attract talent, starting with a more flexible work-life balance. 
We are honoured to be a part of the Australian Financial Review’s Fast 100 list. This would not have been possible without our customers. And kudos to the global LiveTiles team who keep elevating our belief, making great employee experiences, an essential part of today’s culture-driven, modern workplace. Mere words are not enough.
Thousands of people across the world joined the LiveTiles Let’s Connect virtual event featuring visionary thought leader and bestselling author Simon Sinek.

What is the state of employee experience? 

Blog

What is the state of employee experience? 

Employee experience is coming into focus for many organizations and is emerging as a major priority for HR teams who want to build a better and more sustainable
Video background of people

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

Employee experience is coming into focus for many organizations and is emerging as a major priority for HR teams who want to build a better and more sustainable working experience for the future. However, there is still some confusion about exactly what employee experience is, and what needs to be done to improve it. 

Building on our exceptional session with Simon Sinek, we wanted to find out exactly where we are with employee experience in 2021, so we commissioned a survey to gather the thoughts of over 7,000 employees around the world. In this post, we explore findings from the first global LiveTiles employee experience survey, with insights drawn from our free to download report.

Employee experience: an unprecedented opportunity 


Employee experience refers to the strength of emotional connection an individual feels towards the organization they work for, emerging from the experience that person has across all the touchpoints with their employer. It’s an exceptionally important topic, impacting everything from talent attraction and retention, to productivity, to customer experience. Employee experience is integral to the long-term success of any organization.

As the pandemic is hopefully entering its latter stages, there is an unprecedented opportunity to look at employee experience and make the kind of changes that will make work better in the long-term. Working patterns have been disrupted and fundamentally changed, and we have seen some degree of re-evaluation both from organizations and individuals. For employees, the result is a record number of voluntary resignations. For HR functions, this means new policies introducing hybrid working on a formal basis, an increased focus on wellbeing and more emphasis on listening. Anecdotally, we’re seeing this across multiple organizations – a trend which we find highly encouraging.

While any move to improve employee experience is positive, we wanted to get a sense of the scale of the task at hand. How do employees feel about their employers right now? What is their sense of connection? How has the pandemic impacted their experience of work? 

Our survey consulted over 7,000 employees across seven major economies: Australia, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Switzerland, the UK and the USA, answering a detailed set of questions. Overall, the survey results make for sobering reading, and show that, collectively, we have a lot of work to do within employee experience. We believe having high-value data like this will help start conversations and trigger actions, encouraging organizations to embark on their employee experience journey.

 

 

Five key trends from the LiveTiles global employee experience survey

In our survey report, we have identified five key trends:

1. We need to transform the experience of work
Employee experience is in a fragile and uncertain state, with results consistently showing high proportions of employees are stressed, disconnected and dissatisfied. For example, nearly half of all staff told us they are “fed up”, “stressed” and “exhausted”, while a further 43% have issues with felling ignored and invisible. The message is loud and clear – we need to transform the experience of work.

2. The pandemic has broken employee experience, and ‘the great resignation’ is the result 

The pandemic has brought matters to a head. Employee experience has been badly bruised, resulting in record numbers of employees voluntarily leaving their posts. Our survey shows 37% of employees are now actively looking for a new job. The results also show that COVID-19 is very likely a contributing factor: compared to a year ago, over a third (34%) of employees are working more hours, while 28% agree that their job has become harder. 

2. We’re collectively failing the frontline 

We segmented our survey’s results by multiple factors including age, salary, sector and role. Our analysis reveals that frontline workers in sectors such as hospitality, retail, healthcare and mining are consistently more dissatisfied across multiple aspects of employee experience including stress, pay, flexibility and the digital workplace. We need a change in mindset to support our frontline employees. 

3. Welcome to Generation Excluded 

The survey also reveals another key demographic who are feeling disenchanted and disengaged – younger employees. Only 18% of 24- to 35-year-olds fully agree they feel valued at work, and 80% are not satisfied with their connection to their workplace’s organizational culture. Urgent action is needed to stop a generation feeling excluded from work.

4. The inhospitable sector 

The confluence of all these trends can be seen in industries such as the hospitality sector. Here, 45% of staff report being either “stressed” or “exhausted”. 85% feel they are underpaid, and 77% think more could be done to improve work-life balance. A comprehensive rethink is needed here.
 


Digging deeper into the data
 


These findings only really scratch the surface. Digging deeper into the data, the report features detailed analysis across four areas – Day-to-day engagement, Connection & culture, Health & wellbeing and Pay & job security – and reveals multiple trends and eyebrow-raising results, including:
 

  • Less than a quarter (24%) of employees agree strongly with the statement: “I enjoy my work” 
  • Only 28% fully agree that they have the right level of flexibility and work-life balance 
  • Only 24% strongly agree that their employee cares about their well-being 
  • Only 17% of employees are completely satisfied with their level of remuneration 
  • Over a third feel nervous about their job security.

Read more in the latest LiveTiles Press Release: Generation Excluded: Younger employees feel under-valued, ill-equipped, and disconnected in the workplace. 

 

Download the report now! 

The LiveTiles global employee experience survey report is now available for free download. 

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In 2018, Alex Edmans, Professor of Finance at London Business School, estimated that talents today would only want to work for purpose-driven firms.

Read more

How to Shape Company Culture

Blog

How to Shape Company Culture

Workplace culture is a powerful tool in creating strong connections and improving employee experience, with the digital workplace helping.
Woman working with company culture

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

If there’s one major learning for companies during this pandemic, it’s this: Workplace culture is a powerful tool in creating strong connections and improving employee experience, especially  among organizations which now struggle to manage the digital workplace.

Alarmingly, a study by Gallup shows that only 20% of the global workforce felt engaged at work over the past year. Our own LiveTiles Global Employee Experience Pulse Check 2021  shows us that 47% of employees surveyed are either “fed up”, “stressed” or “exhausted” at work. In addition, 43% of respondents indicate that they feel ignored or invisible. 

Undoubtedly, culture has now become more tangible and managers are recognizing, some for the first time, the strategic importance of getting it right. As Peter Nguyen-Brown, Co-Founder & Chief Experience Officer of LiveTiles says, “In a virtual world we must be more prescriptive, and we must work harder on building trust and connectivity with our work colleagues.”



What is Culture?

Corporate culture is an elusive element of employee experience; a group phenomenon anchored on unspoken behaviors, mindsets, and social patterns. While top management formulates company goals based on corporate values, it is culture that expresses these goals and guides workforce activity and behavior.

Authors ​​Groysberg, Lee, Price and Cheng of the Harvard Business Review  define culture as “the tacit social order of an organization: It shapes attitudes and behaviors in wide-ranging and durable ways. Cultural norms define what is encouraged, discouraged, accepted, or rejected within a group.”


What are the Kinds of Culture?

Based on a review of related literature, the authors posit that culture can be determined by how people interact, cultures that value independence encourage autonomy, individual action, and competition; while cultures that value interdependence emphasize integration, relationship management, and group coordination.

Another factor affecting culture is response to change. Cultures that value stability tend to follow rules, reinforce hierarchy, and highlight efficiency; cultures that value flexibility prioritize innovation, diversity, and openness.

Thus the authors have identified eight different types of company culture:

  • Caring, which highlights relationships and mutual trust
  • Purpose, characterized by idealism and altruism
  • Learning, focused on exploration, expansiveness, and creativity
  • Enjoyment, which values fun and excitement
  • Results, focused on achievement and winning
  • Authority, characterized by strength, decisiveness, and boldness
  • Safety, which highlights planning, caution, and preparedness
  • Order, anchored on respect, structure, and shared norms



Employee experience graph

Source: The Harvard Business Review (January-February 2018)


How Do We Shape Culture?

To shape your company’s culture, first identify a culture that aligns with your company’s strategic direction. For example, if your goal is to build a stronger brand through customer satisfaction, you may express it thus: “As a company, we connect genuinely with our customers and serve them happily by actively seeking solutions to their communication problems.”

Next, identify your current culture and assess its impact on the company today. Identify your culture’s strengths and interview key stakeholders from different levels of the organization.

Don’t forget to assess external factors, both present and future, that may affect your strategic decisions. By doing so you will be able to determine which cultural styles need to be strengthened or dialed back depending on the circumstances.

Finally, translate the target as a priority for organizational change. It may mean creating a new position or department. Or it may mean adopting a new system to communicate better with employees and assure them of a voice.



Develop a Winning Culture

As companies navigate their way out of this pandemic, let’s use culture as a powerful tool to redirect our energies and motivate our workforce. Vanessa Ferguson, Senior Vice President of People and Experience at LiveTiles, notes, “If you’re working predominantly from your home, sitting in the same space for eight hours a day, you want to be enjoying what you’re doing and you want it to mean something. And usually, you want it to be connected to something bigger than just revenues for the company, whether it’s climate change initiatives or racial justice.”

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In 2018, Alex Edmans, Professor of Finance at London Business School, estimated that talents today would only want to work for purpose-driven firms.

Read more

The following article provides practical advice for HR teams to improve employee engagement through the use of powerful Digital Workplace tools.
Despite decades of talk within HR circles espousing the ideals of flexible work, the sudden imposition of lockdowns and work from home orders by governments in countless countries from early 2020 has made what was once an academic ideal a lived reality for millions
At LiveTiles we’re all about employee experience – and for our company and our people, that means always supporting and honouring diversity and inclusivity.

The Global Employee 
Experience Pulse Check 2021

Blog

The Global Employee 
Experience Pulse Check 2021

Seven countries, seven thousand employees, provocative results. The first global EX report reveals the massive generational and technological gaps in today’s modern workplace.
Global employee experience pulse check cover image

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

From the knowledge worker to the people on the factory floor, get a fresh perspective on connecting uninspired employees, and find ways of reaching out to revive the faltering pulse of a culture-driven organization.

What’s inside?

This global edition takes a deeper look into what today’s workforce is experiencing, poses difficult questions HR pros and CEOs would love to ask, and:

  • Actionable survey results from heavily affected industries (healthcare, retail, hospitality).
  • Rich, granular data from brands with varying workforce numbers.
  • Open-ended questions and anonymized responses.
  • A deeper look: Does employee experience drive business outcomes?
  • And recommended steps plus resources for better employee experiences.


Download the report.

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

Communicating with staff in a way that resonates is tough at the best of times, and the pandemic has highlighted how much companies need to do in this space.
The future of work is hybrid – a model of flexible working practices that shifts between home, office, deskless and co-working locations depending on the need.
In this series, we focus on industries most affected by frontline work, including, construction, retail, and healthcare, and the specific challenges they face. We’ll explore which employees are impacted most, and how companies are planning for the future of work.

Generation Excluded: Younger employees feel under-valued, ill-equipped, and disconnected in the workplace.  

News

Generation Excluded: Younger employees feel under-valued, ill-equipped, and disconnected in the workplace.  

New global survey rings the alarm bell for employers to embrace Gen Z if they are to successfully retain and attract talent, starting with a more flexible work-life balance. 

Workers from Generation Z (born from early 1990s up to 2010) are willing to leave companies that fail to invest in Employee Experience for jobs with lower pay, new research from LiveTiles reveals. 

According to the Global Employee Experience Pulse Check 2021 reveals that the key demographic of younger employees is feeling disenchanted and disengaged. Only 18% of 24- to 35-year-olds fully agree they feel valued at work, and 80% are not satisfied with their connection to their workplace’s organizational culture.  

Gen Z’ers consistently score lowest in some critical Employee Experience (EX) components including: 

  • 82% are not satisfied with how they are valued at work (25-34yrs) 
  • 76% feel they do not have the right tools to do the job (25-34yrs) 
  • 48% (18-24) / 44% (24-34) would move job for a better EX (even if it meant lower pay) 
  • 47% say they cannot fully disconnect from work afterhours (compared to 58% of older employees of 45-54 years old.) 
  • 46% feeling stressed, exhausted, and fed-up (25-34yrs) 

“Urgent action is needed to stop an entire generation feeling excluded from work and to pay more attention to their need for a more flexible, purpose-driven and human-centered workplace,” said Karl Redenbach, CEO of LiveTiles 

 

We are collectively failing the frontline. 

 

 

The unique needs of deskless workers are also being consistently overlooked. The report discloses that frontline workers in sectors such as hospitality, retail and healthcare are consistently the most dissatisfied across multiple aspects of employee experience including stress, pay, flexibility and the digital workplace. Those in physical work and customer-facing roles such as healthcare and hospitality are the least satisfied (74%) with the tech tools they are provided with to do their jobs.  

The confluence of all these trends is especially evident in the hospitality sector with elevated levels of stress and exhaustion and with 85% feeling they are underpaid, while 77% think more could be done to improve work-life balance.  

 

 

Employee Experience is in a fragile and uncertain state.  

 

Redenbach continued: “The message is loud and clear – we need to transform the experience of work. We need a change in mindset and better approaches to support and actively listen to our employees, especially those on the frontlines. In a hybrid and virtual world, we need to work harder to build trust and connection with our colleagues.” 

Pete Nguyen Brown, LiveTiles Chief Experience Officer (CXO) adds: “Employee experience has been badly bruised by the pandemic, resulting in record numbers of employees voluntarily leaving their posts. Our survey shows 37% of employees are now actively looking for a new job with 72% dissatisfied with their current levels of flexibility. There are clear lessons to be drawn from this global consultation not least that employees need to be seen, heard and understood.” 

This feeds into the feedback that 47% of employees globally are feeling stressed, disconnected, and dissatisfied at work while a further 43% have issues with felling ignored and invisible. 

 

 

What employees want employers to do to improve employee experience. 

 

When asked what can be done to improve the situation employees were clear: 

  • 82% want their employers to consider flexible work arrangements. 
  • 65% want fit-for-purpose digital workplace tech to enhance the employee experience. 
  • 42% ask that employers improve overall communications. 
  • 38% want more wellbeing initiatives. 
  • 33% advise employers to work harder to retain talented staff by creating a better working environment. 
  •  

Nguyen-Brown continued: “Great Employee Experience is when employees feel deeply connected to a company’s purpose and values and when employees are enabled to perform at their best and are happy and healthy at work and in lifeEmployee experience is now business critical, and it is incredibly important to devise a set of metrics to measure thisSustainable long-term success is intrinsically linked to organisations that focus on culture, trust, connectivity and engagement – all of which are the foundations of great employee experience. 

Media enquires to: paul.conneally@livetileglobal.com or chris@chriscartwrightcomms.com 

 

Download the report now to access all the results and analysis. 

 

Sign up today for a special online event in January 2022 where we will present the data and insights in more detail and hear from leaders who are prioritizing employee experience in their organisations. 

New global survey rings the alarm bell for employers to embrace Gen Z if they are to successfully retain and attract talent, starting with a more flexible work-life balance. 
We are honoured to be a part of the Australian Financial Review’s Fast 100 list. This would not have been possible without our customers. And kudos to the global LiveTiles team who keep elevating our belief, making great employee experiences, an essential part of today’s culture-driven, modern workplace. Mere words are not enough.

Read more

Future-proof your business, revolutionize frontline engagement, and supercharge the employee experience: LiveTiles’ latest whitepaper outlines the strategy to succeed during “business unusual”
There are many trends shaping the future of work in 2021 and beyond. From new safety protocols to closely managing the employee experience, nearly all industries have been impacted in some way or another.
Hybrid and Remote workplaces are here to stay. 2020 saw tens of millions of employees in the US forced into full-time remote work, and for others, in-office work was severely restricted for health and safety.

LiveTiles ranks as 5th fastest growing enterprise SaaS company on AFR’s Fast 100 list

News

LiveTiles ranks as 5th fastest growing enterprise SaaS company on AFR’s Fast 100 list

We are honoured to be a part of the Australian Financial Review’s Fast 100 list. This would not have been possible without our customers. And kudos to the global LiveTiles team who keep elevating our belief, making great employee experiences, an essential part of today’s culture-driven, modern workplace. Mere words are not enough.
Australian Financial Review Announcement meeting

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

We are honoured to be a part of the Australian Financial Review’s Fast 100 list. This would not have been possible without our customers who help us every day to shape our product offering. And kudos to the global LiveTiles team who keep elevating our belief, making great employee experiences, an essential part of today’s culture-driven, modern workplace. Mere words are not enough. 

 

AFR’s Fast 100 list takes revenue data from companies who started trading before July 1st, 2016. Businesses have turnover greater than $500,000 in 2016 to 2017 along with three years of revenue data to enter the list. With businesses subjected to the pandemic, last year’s growth rates should be significantly slower. But that’s not the case here. The ones on the list showed resilience and flourished despite the bottlenecks in every affected industry. 

 

As organisations catch up and adapt to the current landscape, we believe significant attention and action are needed towards creating meaningful workplace connections. The numbers speak for themselves. Frontline, admin, and knowledge-based employees agree. Workplace dynamics are experiencing a massive shift, where employees are front and centre.  

 

Shameless plug: If you need hard, compelling data and actionable insights for 2022, follow us on LinkedIn, where we’ll soon be sharing our recent Global Employee Experience Pulse Check 2021. With 7000+ respondents across seven countries, you will get insights about why business outcomes strongly correlate with a healthy workplace culture.  

 

The rapid acceleration to a hybrid working model and permanent WFH arrangements is in full swing and irreversible. Virtual collaboration is now the norm. And people are head over heels on flexible work—plus the benefit it brings—even if it means reducing take-home pay. This is a clear sign of change and, it begs the question:  

 

How fast will companies adopt this new wave of change? Time will tell. 

 

Now, it’s time we reach new horizons, connect with disengaged employees, and create an environment that normalises well-being and happiness. 

 

We at LiveTiles predict, better workplace culture will become tomorrow’s most highly valued currency.  

Thank you to AFR and sponsors Pemba and KPMG who made the Fast 100 list possible. 

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

In this series, we focus on industries most affected by frontline work, including, construction, retail, and healthcare, and the specific challenges they face. We’ll explore which employees are impacted most, and how companies are planning for the future of work.
Frontline workers are the first point of contact between your company and the outside world. Cashiers, sales staff, or your customer service team are the face of your business. It’s important to ensure they feel like empowered and productive team members.

How Companies Can Navigate “The Great Resignation”

Blog

How Companies Can Navigate “The Great Resignation”

On top of face masks, outdoor dining and online meetings, one of the many legacies the pandemic may leave behind is the “Great Resignation”, as coined by Anthony Klotz.  
Man leaving the office under the great resignation

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

The associate professor at Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, first coined the term in the second quarter of 2021, when the US tallied some 3.9 million people quit their jobs. By September, that number had jumped to 4.4 million, about 3% of the country’s total workforce. It was by far the highest number since the government started keeping track back in 2001.  

 

Klotz coined the term when interviewed by Bloomberg about the rising number of resignations at that time. The business administration professor said pandemic-induced “epiphanies”, from better work-life balance, rethinking the long commute, to more livable pay, made many ask themselves what truly matters.  

 

“During the pandemic, because there was a lot of death and illness and lockdowns, we really had the time and the motivation to sit back and say, do I like the trajectory of my life? Am I pursuing a life that brings me well-being?” Klotz said in another NPR interview 

 

The phenomenon has challenged companies everywhere to establish, and maintain, a work culture that retains and attracts the best talents. It has forced founders and human resource heads to create better employee experience 

 

According to LiveTiles Digital Workplace Trends 2021, the “hybrid workplace”, or the combination of remote and on-site work is now one of the pandemic-induced setups employees want to keep for good. The report emphasized: “a good salary is simply not enough… Employees want to feel they are making a difference beyond driving shareholder value.”  

 

Often this means allowing employees to build lives outside of work. The influx of millennials and Gen Z employees in offices has also pushed this narrative further. Companies would now have to carve a part of their resources that will allow employees to form and nurture personal projects; to let them make their lives “more than just about their jobs”. This also means nourishing a workplace culture that allows employees to thrive in their careers while doing so.  

 

So what can companies do?  

 

With the job crunch, employees know they have leverage. Competitive pay is no longer the sole deal breaker. Companies would now have to understand the crucial importance of flexibility, and be more creative with the benefits they can offer to talents.  

 

WillisTowersWatson survey showed that in Asia Pacific, 72 percent of employers plan to customize their workplace benefits in the next two years with employee well-being as the top priority in the strategy.  

 

This would only be successful if employers learn how to actively listen (and have systems in place to make this happen), and implement changes based on their employees’ responses. It is time for employers to include employees in the decision-making process. Ask questions to employees and listen to their answers intently. The basic model is to “listen, act, resolve”. All the listening would be in vain if employees see no results.  

 

Lastly, when the risks of the pandemic have passed, do not be afraid to create organic bonding moments among employees, in person. Whether that may mean office dinners or free concerts, it is worth remembering that some of the best memories of people at work happen when they are with colleagues they’ve enjoyed working with.  

 

It’s apparent that for companies to survive in the post-pandemic era, they must start creating jobs that add value to the lives of their employees. As said by the World Economic Forum, companies must now establish a culture of “individualized working conditions”. The best companies know that the best talents deliver. It’s about cultivating a culture of trust and empowerment, rather than one where  bosses feel they need to be hovering over the shoulders of their employees.  

 

 

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

The infinite wisdom of Simon Sinek

Blog

The infinite wisdom of Simon Sinek

Thousands of people across the world joined the LiveTiles Let’s Connect virtual event featuring visionary thought leader and bestselling author Simon Sinek.
Simon Sinek

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

The theme for the event was employee experience – and there is no wonder why so many people tuned in to hear Simon tackle the hard-hitting questions given the size and rate of change transforming the way we work and live.

 

Over the past year, only 20% of the global workforce felt engaged [1] and 37% of employees said they were over-demanded during the pandemic [2], which is alarming considering we spend almost one third of our life at work.

 

Sinek proved he was up for the challenge, taking questions from a diverse range of people from all walks of life including nurses working in COVID wards, hospitality workers, professionals from the corporate sector and not-for-profits, students in quarantine on remote islands and everything in between.

 

In this article, I share the nuggets of gold that will help you transform the way you think and feel about work and lead your team and your broader company into an era of a better working world.

 

In my closing commentary from the Simon Sinek event, I noted what we see as the 5 key pillars of EX based on our knowledge of the topic and from everything we heard, and I’ve included a summary of this below. Over the coming weeks we’ll be sharing further insights, particularly in relation to each of the pillars of EX including Connection, Engagement, Well-being, Performance and Inspiration.

 

The 5 pillars of employee experience by LiveTiles

 


Devise and implement metrics to measure employee experience

 

In simple terms, at LiveTiles we see Employee Experience as the strength of emotional connection that emerges from the experience between a person and their employer. Great Employee Experience is where employees are deeply connected and engaged to a company’s purpose, brand, values and vision, and where employees are enabled to perform at their best and are happy and healthy at work and in life – and it’s incredibly important to devise a set of metrics to measure it.

 

One of the main reasons that most companies do not measure employee experience is not because it’s unmeasurable, but because it’s difficult to do. Instead, companies tend to stick to the tangibles and measure widgets, sales numbers, revenues, profit and market share.

 

However, companies that fail to take steps to understand and measure employee experience over the longer term will be the ones that suffer. Research has shown that sustainable long-term success is intrinsically linked to organisations that focus on culture, trust, connectivity and engagement – all the foundations of great employee experience.

 


Gradual change trumps a Band-Aid

 

People don’t fear change, they fear sudden change. And great leadership with empathy can overcome any challenges and issues that arise with change programs.

 

Instead of giving your employees a PowerPoint presentation that talks about why this change is necessary, leaders should take the time to understand their experience and points of view. And if there are concerns it is important to offer additional training, extend handholding programs, offer a course to take them on the change journey rather than just thrusting it upon them.

 

It is also important to recognise and accept that change happens at different paces for different people. We cannot expect or force people to embrace and adopt things at the same time.

 


Human connection on virtual platforms requires ‘much more work’

 

In a virtual world we must be more prescriptive, and we must work harder on building trust and connectivity with our work colleagues. The famous violinist Isaac Stern said, “music is what happens between the notes” – and at work, trust is built between the meetings.

 

In a virtual world we must purposely create those engagements and provide spaces where you don’t talk about work and focus on the human elements of a person’s life.

 

The telephone is also an underrated channel for connectivity. We are truly engaged on the phone and if somebody is distracted, we can say, ‘are you there?’ So, pick up the phone, call your team members sporadically and often, and do not wait for things to go wrong to check in.

 


There are no such things as ‘soft skills’

 

We tend to talk about hard skills and soft skills as opposites that are working against each other when in fact they work together in concert.

 

We should be teaching hard skills (the skills you need to do your job) and human skills (the way to be a good person, a good leader) together and hold them as equally important qualities.

 

As it turns out when we teach people those human skills, not only does it benefit the employee in how they relate with people at work, it also benefits them in how they relate with people in life and they become better human beings.

 

People in general want to be recognised for being a human being, not just a cog in a machine. The more skills we can give them to ensure they are seen, heard and understood, pays dividends for the company, the employee and for society as a whole.

 


Honesty, vulnerability and transparency are key

 

Regular, informal and consistent check-ins and feedback are important. You can still have the annual reviews, but ongoing connectivity is valuable. A simple question such as “How are you?” can open an honest dialogue and give context to how people are performing at work – and better still, how you can help them to be the best version of themselves.

 

It’s important for leaders to know that you don’t always need to be tough, positive and have all the answers.

 

Your vulnerability and honestly provides your team and emerging leaders with the permission to do the same.

 

We can’t wait to continue our journey with passionate EX people in the industry, share our joint thoughts and learnings, and ensure that great EX can thrive in the workplace!

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

In the office

ADDRESS

98 West 21th Street, Suite 721 New York, NY 10010

E : contact@livetilesglobal.com

P : +88 (0) 101 0000 000

POST GALLERY

2021 © All rights reserved by LiveTiles

Site Terms  Privacy  Advertisement Cookies  Policy  Contact Us

Improving employee engagement in the post COVID-era

Blog

Improving employee engagement in the post COVID-era

The following article provides practical advice for HR teams to improve employee engagement through the use of powerful Digital Workplace tools.
Working in the post Covid-era

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

Communicating with staff in a way that resonates is tough at the best of times, and the pandemic has highlighted how much companies need to do in this space.

 

Happy, healthy people are the cornerstone of any productive and profitable organisation, which has made gauging and improving employee engagement a holy grail of the HR profession for decades.

 

Keeping your staff engaged with their job, your customers, and each other has always been an important priority, but never more so than in the challenging environment we’re all facing as we slowly emerge from the shadows of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

For many of us, the past 18 months has been one of the most difficult periods in our professional lives, as we’ve navigated the demands of remote work on top of caring for children, elderly parents, and pets. Not to mention the general anxiety that’s come from months living under strict lockdown measures. It’s entirely understandable that people’s motivation and resilience wereas tested, and in many cases proven, as we continued showing up to (remotely) work despite it all.

 

In this environment, powerful Digital Workplace technology has more than proven its worth in creating a positive employee experience, keeping us connected and productive in ways we never previously imagined. It can also play a crucial role in boosting employee engagement and ensuring your staff feel like they’re part of a bigger team as they move towards more ‘normal’ times once again.

 

 

 

Defining Employee Engagement: Passion and commitment

 

There are as many definitions for the term “employee engagement” as there isare differing (yet equally valid) advice on how to boost it to unlock your people’s true potential. We particularly like this definition below from CustomInsight – a Silicon Valley based HR solutions provider that works closely with Fortune 500 companies.

 

Employee engagement is the extent to which employees feel passionate about their jobs, are committed to the organization, and put discretionary effort into their work.

 

As you will have noticed, the words “passionate” and “committed” describe the key attributes of an engaged employee. They are someone who is willing to go the extra mile for their employer, because they feel like they belong to something bigger than themselves. They have a sense of ownership over their organisation’s cause or purpose and it acts as an animating force, maintaining their motivation through the inevitable ups and downs of working life.

 

It’s also worth noting the distinction between employee engagement and employee satisfaction. Whereas an engaged employee will go above and beyond for their organisation, a merely satisfied one may be entirely comfortable in their role yet happy to just collect a paycheck with minimal effort. Which brings us to why employee engagement matters and how measuring and taking solid steps to boost it can pay dividends for your organisation.

 

Whereas an engaged employee will go above and beyond for their organisation, a merely satisfied one may be entirely comfortable in their role yet happy to just collect a paycheck with minimal effort.

 

 

Why Employee Engagement Matters: The productivity connection

 

Whilst common sense tells us that having happy, engaged staff is a good thing in general, countless academic studies have proven the hard productivity and financial gains it offers to organisations who get this crucial aspect of their HR puzzle right.

 

Take for example an extensive 2013 Gallup Workplace study which found an engaged worker achieves on average 21% higher productivity compared to a disengaged worker. This is due to being more focused and motivated, and therefore delivering better customer/client service. In the same study, engaged workers were also found to have 65% lower turnover and 37% lower absenteeism. If this is applied across an entire workforce it could translate into significant cost savings and revenue gains!

 

In fact, disengaged workers are likely to cost their organisation money, with later Gallup Research from 2017quantifying the price of disengagement in the United States as high as a stunning $550 billion per annum in lost productivity.

 

HR professionals and senior leaders are well aware of this challenge, especially given the strong links between healthy employee engagement and higher productivity. 71% according to a HBR study ranked employee engagement as very important to achieving their overall organisational success, however only 24% rated their employees as being highly engaged. This closely mirrors a general breakdown of engagement levels across a typical global company:

 

  • Engaged (15% of the workforce)
  • Not Engaged (67% of the workforce)
  • Actively Disengaged (18% of the workforce)

 

 

The Four Elements of Employee Engagement

 

With the challenge of improving employee engagement and the benefits it can bring to an organisation well established, it’s now time to delve a little deeper into the four key elements that drive engagement. These are divided between the organisational and manager factors that directly impact upon an employee’s experience of their job:

 

Organisational Factors

 

Organisational factors measure how engaged an employee is with their organisation as a whole, including the performance of senior management and its broader culture. 

 

Culture of Engagement

Does your organisation have an open and welcoming culture that respects staff and empowers them to do their job to the best of their abilities? 

 

Strategic Alignment

Do your staff understand where your organisation is heading (its strategic direction) and how they as individuals can contribute to its success, as well as developing their own careers?



Manager Factors

 

Manager factors as the name suggests measure how an employee relates to their direct manager or supervisor and the impact this has on them performing their job effectively.

 

Motivating and Relating

Do managers listen to their direct reports and motivate them to perform to the best of their abilities? Are they building strong, cohesive teams that can openly share ideas and support one another?

 

Managing Execution

Are managers clearly defining roles and responsibilities with their direct reports, giving them the guidance and sense of control they need to perform their jobs effectively? Are they also providing timely feedback to improve future performance?

 


It’s now clear an employee’s level of engagement is driven by their sense of belonging to both their immediate team and the wider organisation they work for. This sense of belonging leads to motivation and ultimately higher productivity. Also clear from the research is the importance of a positive company culture in fostering this sense of belonging and supporting open communication both across and within teams. This is where the benefits of Digital Workplacetechnology like Intranet Hubs and pulse check tools such as LiveTiles Vibe come to the fore, which leads us to our final section. 

 

 

How to Improve Employee Engagement?

 

5 practical tips for your organisation

 

We’ve just spoken a lot about what employee engagement is, why it matters for productivity, and the elements that drive engaged employees. Now we’re finally ready to dive into some practical solutions for improving employee engagement that your organisation might consider. Our advice begins with first measuring how your staff are currently traveling – especially important at a time when remote work is the norm, before suggesting powerful Digital Workplacetools that can be used to foster a great employee experience that keeps people connected and motivated to a bigger purpose. 

 

  1. Use regular pulse checks 

Like anything in business, “what gets measured gets managed” and this is no different when it comes to improving employee engagement. Short and regular surveys, such as employee pulse checks are a great way to gauge the level of engagement amongst your workforce at both an individual and aggregate level. The data you collect from these surveys can then be used to identify emerging issues and correct courses to keep your people engaged and feeling heard.

 

  1. Unite your workforce through regular communication 

In this post COVID-era hybrid work is the new norm, with some of your staff working from home whilst others are in the office. In many organisations, you will have some or all staff working remotely all the time. Whatever your setup, clear and effective internal communications is key to keeping your people up to date with company news, events, policies and procedures, and each other.

 

Powerful intranets with app-based extensions can play this role, offering a single source of truth for your people, keeping them connected to what’s happening across their organisation whilst maintaining your crucial company culture. 

 

Productivity maintained across many organisations throughout the long months of lockdown and mass remote work, in many cases it actually improved, especially for knowledge workers according to the Harvard Business Review study.

 

Other studies including from the BBC and Bloomberg place these productivity gains – from less time wasted commuting to fewer distractions from chatty co-workers – anywhere between 5-13%.

 

Given how successful this forced experiment was and the employee gains it unlocked (notwithstanding the feelings of isolation and loneliness many felt), it’s no surprise many workers are eager to still work at least a few days a week from the comfort of their own home.

 

  1. Clearly define roles and responsibilities 

Giving all your staff a clearly defined role and connecting their individual role to broader organisational goals is a highly effective way to boost their levels of engagement and sense of ownership over their own careers. While role responsibilities and expectations should be effectively communicated as part of their onboarding process, this information can be permanently housed in an easy to find place within your company’s intranet.  

The right tool for the job: LiveTiles Directory – Get to know your people by automating the entire collection of personnel data. Create a rich skills/people finder, with role-based content targeting, and effective process automation.

 

  1. Focus on wellbeing 

One of the big positives to come out of the COVID-19 experience of 2020 is the prioritisation of employee wellbeing as not only something that’s nice to take care of, but also an important determinant of organisational performance. With employee health and wellbeing now top of mind, simple things like hosting regular team catch ups via video calls or in person gatherings, and encouraging staff to take time for a walk outside in the fresh air, are quick wins for improving engagement whilst strengthening company culture.

 

The right tool for the job: LiveTiles Reach – an internal communication tool and pocket intranet that boosts engagement, retention, and connection for all employees regardless of where they work.

 

  1. Don’t forget to have fun! 

Finally, don’t forget to have fun with your staff by celebrating your wins, commiserating the inevitable ups and downs of working life and hosting those Friday afternoon chats where everyone lets their hair down a little. Whilst productivity is obviously important, so are those intangible aspects, like the human connections between colleagues and those shared moments of joy that are the true building blocks of a company’s culture. Nothing does more to improve employee engagement!

 

The right tool for the job: A solid internet connection, Microsoft Teams (or Zoom), good people, shared experiences, shared goals, and solid stories to tell.

 

Keen to learn more about enhancing employee engagement with our powerful LiveTiles employee experience platform? Get in touch with us today! 

 

 

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

Return to the office internal communications guide

Blog

Return to the office internal communications guide

Despite decades of talk within HR circles espousing the ideals of flexible work, the sudden imposition of lockdowns and work from home orders by governments in countless countries from early 2020 has made what was once an academic ideal a lived reality for millions
Return to office dilemmas

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

We’ve all experienced significant changes to the way we live and work, thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic that has wreaked havoc across the world these past 18 months.

 

Despite decades of talk within HR circles espousing the ideals of flexible work, the sudden imposition of lockdowns and work from home orders by governments in countless countries from early 2020 has made what was once an academic ideal a lived reality for millions.

 

18 months on, rapid vaccine rollouts are thankfully taming the pandemic in many nations and our societies are gradually reopening to in person gatherings, including a belated return to the office for many workers. We know nothing can replace face-to-face contact for fostering a strong company culture and encouraging collaboration and innovative ideas from those impromptu ‘water cooler conversations’ with colleagues.

 

However, many people have grown quite comfortable working from home and some naturally are anxious about leaving the comfort of their kitchen table for a traditional office-bound desk. That’s why effective internal communications are more important than ever, to welcome staff back to an office they may not have seen for well over a year and ease their transition into what will likely be a long-term hybrid workplace model. 

 

 

New Normal: The Hybrid Workplace is here to stay

 

Like many trends that were lingering in the background before COVID-19 disrupted our lives with great force in 2020, a decade of change in how we work was compressed into just a few short months by sheer necessity. Remote worksuddenly became the norm and digital transformation for many organisations was accelerated as they embraced powerful tools like company intranets and integrated collaboration platforms such as Microsoft 365, necessary to enable their staff to work from anywhere at anytime.

 

As offices reopen, flexibility will remain a key expectation of employees, and the future of work is looking very likely to be a hybrid workplace model that combines a few days a week in the office, balanced by a few days working from home. Current research all points towards this strong preference for flexibility amongst workers, including a Microsoft Work Trend Index study that found over 70% want hybrid work practices to continue, whilst at the same time 65% are craving face-to-face contact with their colleagues once again. This is especially true for younger workers who are more likely to live alone, feel isolated by constant remote work and are in the delicate process of establishing their careers.

 

Conversely, the same Microsoft study highlighted the fact 41% of workers are considering changing employers within the next 12 months, whilst a separate US study by Nielsen in August 2020 found a substantial 80% would prefer to work for a company that embraces flexibility.

 

The message for employers is clear – offering your staff flexible work options isn’t just a ‘nice to have’ but a real competitive advantage in the ongoing war for talent.

 

 

5 Practical Tips for Smoothing the Return to Office

 

So, what practical steps can you take to help your employees return to the office (even just a day or two a week) and successfully implement a hybrid workplace model that will make your organisation an attractive and productive place to work for years to come? Like many HR challenges – clear and effective internal communication is key.

 

On that note, our LiveTiles Communications team has put together five practical tips to make this crucial transition as smooth as possible.

 

1. Offer your employees a warm welcome back!

After many months, and in some cases well over a year working from home, there’s quite a few employees who are eager to ditch their tracksuit pants and embrace a much-needed change of scenery by returning to the office! Whilst a small group (15% according to a recent Australian study) would prefer to remain WFH forever, compared to a slightly larger cohort (26%) who’d like to be in the office 9-5, 5/days a week – the vast majority of people fall into the middle and are ready to recommence their daily commute at least a few days per week. 

 

What better way to make this experience a rewarding one than to offer all your staff an official ‘welcome back’ pack? This could include a dedicated intranet hub (ideally linked from your intranet’s homepage) with a welcome back message from your company’s leaders (video is best for building an emotional connection), FAQs and all the practical information they need to know to make this transition work.

 

You might also consider going the extra mile and having managers leave handwritten “welcome back”/”we’ve missed you” notes on their team members’ desks. After all, getting back into the office is all about strengthening those human relationships and the sense of camaraderie we have with our colleagues. 

 

  • 15% of staff would prefer permanently working from home
  • 26% prefer permanently working from the office 
  • Most fall in the middle, preferring a hybrid workplace model
  • Offer staff a ‘welcome back’ pack to make their return to office extra special
  • This could include a dedicated return to office intranet hub with:
  • Message from company leaders
  • FAQs
  • Other relevant info
  • Managers should also consider leaving handwritten letters on their team members’ desks 

 

2. Address their concerns: Employee wellbeing is king!

 

Given the supremely challenging times we’ve all lived through and in many countries are continuing to live through thanks to COVID-19, paying close attention to employee wellbeing (both physical and mental) and ensuring clear strategies are in place to deal with feelings of isolation and burnout are vital in this new normal. 

 

This is where the benefit of clear internal communications can empower an HR team to help its people. From providing a central intranet hub that answers FAQs (to reduce uncertainty, a leading cause of stress), an anonymous feedback function where employees can submit their concerns surrounding returning to the office directly to HR, and widely promoting your company’s online Employee Assistance Program (EAP), all these tools can ease the anxiety many people may be feeling and help them form healthy habits to combat stress.

 

Don’t overlook the importance of regular communication both within and across your organisation either. Whether that be regular meetings at set times for small functional teams that work closely together or a whole of office get-together (both in person and simultaneously streamed online) where company updates can be made, laughter can be shared, and issues raised with leaders in a safe environment – all these interactions are vital for forming those solid person-to-person connections that make an individual feel like they belong to a bigger team.

 

It will also make the prospect of returning to the office to be amongst those friendly faces all the more exciting!

 

  • Employee physical and mental wellbeing has never been more important given the challenges of COVID-19
  • Intranet hubs that answer return to office FAQs with in-built feedback functions are a great tool for easing employee anxiety
  • Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) are another great tool to promote
  • Functional team and all of office meetings are also great ways to form solid bonds within an organisation and make people feel part of a bigger team

 

3. Amplify your company culture

A company’s culture – its shared values, attributes and characteristics – is the very glue that holds it together, especially in challenging times like those we’re currently living through. Company culture (often used interchangeably with ‘organisational culture’) has traditionally been formed in an office environment and built up over time through consistent face-to-face interactions and internal rituals, such as a casual office Friday morning tea.

 

When COVID-19 and forced remote work put an abrupt halt to these vital face-to-face interactions, powerful digital workplace technology like LiveTiles Reach stepped into the void, keeping people within organisations connected to each other and preserving that precious company culture that can take years to build. The challenges of 2020 were also, crucially, a shared experience, one that revealed our vulnerabilities and resilience, bringing many organisations even closer together as a result.

 

Building upon this sense of solidarity and amplifying your company’s existing cultural attributes is another key task facing HR teams as workers return to the office; one that can be achieved through simple but meaningful actions. From encouraging managers to leave “welcome back” cards on the desks of their team members, to hosting those regular catch-ups that helped get you through months of lockdown both online yet also in person again, these little things can help further strengthen those bonds that have just withstood one of the greatest disruptions of our lifetime.

 

  • A company’s culture are its shared values, attributes and characteristics
  • Company culture is built over time through face-to-face interaction
  • Digital workplace technology preserved company culture throughout 2020
  • Small yet meaningful actions, such as “welcome back” cards for staff and hosting team catch-ups in person again are great ways to build upon company culture as staff return to the office

 

4. Maintain flexible work arrangements 

One of 2020’s key lessons is the fact that flexible work arrangements actually work. Not only was productivity maintained across many organisations throughout the long months of lockdown and mass remote work, in many cases it actually improved, especially for knowledge workers according to the Harvard Business Review study. Other studies including from the BBC and Bloomberg place these productivity gains – from less time wasted commuting to fewer distractions from chatty co-workers – anywhere between 5-13%.

 

Given how successful this forced experiment was and the employee gains it unlocked (notwithstanding the feelings of isolation and loneliness many felt), it’s no surprise many workers are eager to still work at least a few days a week from the comfort of their own home.

 

A clear role for effective internal communications in this context lies in managing employee expectations around the hybrid workplace arrangements your organisation has in place, including any designated ‘team days’ when they’re expected to be working from the office and also the regular working hours in which they’re expected to be available. These more granular level discussions are best communicated by team managers one-on-one and can be supported by an intranet hub that outlines your organisation’s broader hybrid work policy in clear language.

 

  • 2020 proved that flexible work arrangements are effective 
  • As employees return to the office, a majority would like to still work from home a few days/week
  • Internal communications need to manage employee expectations around hybrid working arrangements and outline HR policy clearly
  • A key role for managers to have direct discussions with team members one-on-one about days in the office and working hours expectations

 

 

5. Communicate with authenticity and consistency

One of the silver linings from the great remote work experiment of the past 18 months is how it’s helped bring the individuals within many organisations closer together despite being physically apart, a direct result of our shared experience living through uniquely challenging times. It’s also, depending on your views, effectively “humanised” leaders and C-Suite executives who’ve also been stuck at home with pets, background domestic noises and kitchen dishes colouring their video calls, just like the rest of us.

 

Harnessing this authenticity, especially in messages from leaders to their workforce as staff return to the office is a powerful tool for maintaining that sense of camaraderie many organisations fostered throughout the long months of working from home.

 

On that note, videos from managers and senior leaders welcoming staff back to their physical premises and explaining how hybrid workplace arrangements will function don’t need sleek production values to be effective. What really matters is the message itself and whether it’s shot on a smartphone or otherwise, an authentic, clear, and informative message will not only resonate more strongly at an emotional level, it will also help address employee concerns and create a dialogue that can change perceptions and behaviour.

 

  • Remote work has helped humanise leaders and C-Suites executive, as we’ve realised they’re not all that different from us
  • Harnessing this authenticity is a powerful tool for addressing employee concerns and creating positive dialogue in internal communications around returning to the office


The forced experiment of moving to remote work en masse in early 2020 was more successful than many organisations expected, thanks to powerful digital workplace technology that allowed us to work productively from home whilst keeping us seamlessly in contact with our colleagues and company culture through many months in lockdown.

 

Now, as our societies reopen and workers belatedly return to the office, effective, authentic internal communications from C-Suite leaders down to functional team managers are a powerful tool to maintain a sense of camaraderie, address employee concerns and ultimately help organisations effectively transition to a hybrid workplace model.

 

Want to learn more about enhancing employee engagement and managing your business’s transition to a hybrid workplace? Get in touch with our LiveTiles team today!

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

Honouring Diversity and Inclusion

Blog

Honouring Diversity and Inclusion

At LiveTiles we’re all about employee experience – and for our company and our people, that means always supporting and honouring diversity and inclusivity.
Diversity and inclusion banner

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

To celebrate Pride Month this June, we are sharing our top three tips on how to support diversity and inclusion in your internal communications.  

 

 

1. Employee-led conversations

 

At LiveTiles, we always support the “whole person”. That means we recognize that our staff are human! When life-changing things happen outside the workplace, it’s impossible (and unreasonable) to expect employees to keep their emotions totally separate from their work life.

 

To support your people, encourage employees to talk about their feelings, concerns, or conflicts in a judgment-free zone where they can rely on the support of their coworkers and managers.

 

If someone seems to be struggling, reach out. Offer a coffee catch-up in the café down the street, go into a meeting room to talk, or send a message via your intranet or employee communications app asking if they’re OK. Some people may be more comfortable sharing via a private chat online, others might prefer face-to-face. If you’re not sure, just ask. 

 

 

2. Share diverse and inclusive stories

 

One of the best ways to promote inclusion is to build connections with people who represent various diverse groups. Invite your people to tell their stories. Ask them questions about their childhood, the hurdles they may have overcome, what they love about their heritage or history, and the things they wish other people understood.  

 

At LiveTiles, we hold global meetings where employees from different countries are invited to share their homeland’s customs and conventions with the company. As well as being fascinating and enjoyable, these kinds of get-togethers help us all to get to know more about our colleagues and celebrate everyone’s individual cultural backgrounds.  

 

Above all, keep connecting with your people, ask their opinions, and let them drive the conversations around sharing their diverse and inclusive stories.  

 

 

3. Consistently share and start Diversity and Inclusion initiatives 

 

Actively share information, recognize days of significance across the D&I community, clearly share support and resources, and consistently share updates on what the organization is doing to drive the D&I strategy and agenda. Invite your people to share their own ideas for new initiatives and encourage staff to suggest updates or improvements to existing resources. Create a devoted channel on your Microsoft Teams or intranet where everyone can contribute their thoughts.  

 

 

Happy Pride Month  

It’s in our company DNA to respect each member of the LiveTiles family. Our company values include “We are decent human beings” and we believe it’s impossible to operate without this core belief. 

 

We will always have a zero-tolerance policy for discrimination. 

 

We support Pride Month this June, and equality and diversity every day of the year. 

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

Four major reasons technology is the key to a great employee experience

Blog

Four major reasons technology is the key to a great employee experience

Communicating with staff in a way that resonates is tough at the best of times, and the pandemic has highlighted how much companies need to do in this space.
Great employee experience

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

“As enterprises get larger, this problem tends to magnify, and the importance of effective engagement is going to become more and more important,” said LiveTiles Director of Technology Solutions, David Salter.

 

“I believe effective internal communications is the glue that holds organizations together, not just during business unusual, but during any time of transformation, be that a merger and acquisition, a change in product or service strategy, a change in leadership, or a public health crisis.

 

“The focus that we have at LiveTiles is really on encouraging organizations to prioritize a great employee experience platform (EXP),” he said.

 

“Bringing together disparate apps into a single experience can really make employees’ lives at work simpler.”

 

Below we outline four ways technology can enable your employee experience (for the better).

 

 

Why technology is a key enabler of a great employee experience 

 

1. Productivity and efficiency
Are there tasks that could be sped up or automated with technology to give staff more time for important work?


2. Staff feel more valued

“It’s just a fact from all the research that has now been very well established over a number of years that people want more than just a pay check from their work,” David said.

 

“Staff want to feel as though their input is encouraged and considered, and importantly, they just want to be informed around what’s going on in the broader business. That’s where the concept of the employee experience platform as a technology enabler will come into play.”

 

3. Talent attraction and retention 
We all understand the costs of losing a good person and having to go through a lengthy recruitment process.

 

“There’s all kinds of research that shows companies that have effective engagement of their employees through technology have much greater success with the attraction and retention of talent,” David said.


4. It helps employees do their job well
A great EXP means frontline workers can stay on top of the latest company updates, ensuring your staff appear helpful and knowledgeable to customers.

 

 

How do we know this? We’ve seen it in action! 

 

LiveTiles recently implemented an EXP platform for a large retailer. Their store managers, who communicate with the store associates, now have an EXP app that allows them to access important compliance policies and protocol related to COVID. They can also easily access the latest retail promotions, which is critical to the customer-facing staff selling on the floor.

 

“This leads to higher sales, so a great employee experience absolutely impacts customer experience,” David said.

 

An EXP that supports your staff to stay on task and feel valued as they work, will not only help them to be more productive and happier, you will be able to attract and keep great workers .

 

Find out more about LiveTiles’ employee experience platform here.

 

Have questions? Our experts are ready to help you. Get in touch here.

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

Three reasons why employee experience is business-critical

Blog

Three reasons why employee experience is business-critical

The future of work is hybrid – a model of flexible working practices that shifts between home, office, deskless and co-working locations depending on the need.
Employee experience is a business critical point related to employee retention

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

It will focus more on outcomes and performance rather than hours spent ‘present’ and ‘clocked-in’. This means that trust will be at the heart of the employee-employer relationship. How we connect and communicate within organizations has now emerged as a core strategic imperative.

 

The organizations that deliver the best employee experiences will be the ones best equipped to succeed in this new flexible world of work. Those who thrive will prioritize being more inclusive, empowering and caring – in short, those who build trust and are more human. In doing so they will excel at recruiting and retaining staff and forge value-driven connections with their employees. We explore these benefits below.

 

 

1. Voice of the employee is essential.

 

 Employee Voice is the most important topic in business and is critical in the hybrid model of work. 75% of the workforce will be made up of digital natives by 2025. This demographic attaches enormous importance to finding and expressing purpose at work and expects a consumer-grade user experience in their digital workplace. 

 

One of our customers (a government ministry) told us recently that providing a great employee experience was critical because it enabled younger employees to share and convey a real sense of purpose and connection – to find meaning in and through their work. This purpose-driven culture gave the organization the competitive advantage they needed to attract great talent when they felt they could not compete on salary alone.

 

By harnessing the employee voice, organizations are also fostering a more inclusive culture where people feel listened to. This cultivates a culture of two-way communication (and not just periodic staff surveys) and is a catalyst for more authentic (grassroots) storytelling, vibrant communities of employee advocates, and stronger ties to the organizations mission and values.

 

 

2. Employee Experience is for everyone.

 

 In this more fluid world, employee experience will be more inclusive of deskless and remote workers, who currently make up approximately 75% of the world’s workforce. These are the people behind the wheel of the van delivering our online purchases, the healthcare workers holding the line against COVID-19, or the retail workers helping us to get our weekly groceries. In other words, the frontline (mostly deskless) workers who are keeping essential services open and the economy moving.

 

Being frontline, deskless or on-the-move does not mean that you need to be out of the loop. This will only diminish a sense of connection to the organization and deprive frontline employees of vital tools to get the job done effectively.

 

Organizations can unlock cost-effective and bespoke employee experience solutions to bring all our people into the digital workforce (even if they have no digital or corporate ID!) using mobile-first platforms that will unite the workforce and boost performance. Such steps can reverse the flight of talent (and the subsequent costs of recruitment), prevent the fragmentation of information, and better equip your employees to know and help customers.

 

 

3. Your workplace is a battleground for attention.

 

 The digital workplace is now a part of the battle for peoples’ attention. This is a crucial issue to recognize as we lean more and more on digital platforms in a hybrid model of work. As digital workplace specialists, the onus is on us to help organizations cut through the noise and value our employees’ time. The responsibility for tech companies (and our customers) is to be cognizant of the demands on people’s attention and do everything we can to alleviate the information and application overload they are bombarded with (which can average 120 different business apps in the workplace alone!).

 

Providing a more integrated, seamless experience and eliminating the sense of people being overwhelmed at work serves to reduce inefficiencies and opportunity costs caused by wasted time (more than 30 days of lost productivity a year according to one study) and brings calm (and even fun and beauty) to a chaotic digital workplace. 

 

Removing tech complexity, simplifying the experience, and letting AI-powered solutions work in the background to take care of the drudge and the overload are all necessary in the hybrid future of work. In short, we must embed communications into the employee experience and not drown our employees in a vortex of apps and channels and expect them to stay afloat.

 

 

Time to humanize the Employee Experience.

 

 The rise of the hybrid workplace, therefore, brings with it a welcome rise in the urgency to humanize the employee experience and personalize the digital workplace.

 

The hybrid workplace is at the intersection of culture and technology whereby people’s time and attention must be more valued, and their well-being better supported in (and outside) the workplace.

 

 

The Hybrid Era has the potential to be the Era of the Employee. 

 

An opportunity to provide the means for people to perform and collaborate more effectively in a workplace where they are happier and healthier. 

 

 

Most of us spend 30% or more of our lives at work.  

 

It’s safe to say it is central to the entire human experience and an important source of fulfillment, identity, and well-being. We cannot delegate something as critically important as Employee Experience to an app. It requires reimagining the workplace as a set of experiences that creates and fosters stronger connections between people and the tech they need to do the job, the colleagues they need to collaborate with, the purpose they seek, and the communities and customers they serve.

 

This article is based on an intense period of consultation and discussion with the LiveTiles global community of customers. If you are interested to learn more about how amazing employee experience can be achieved and set your digital and hybrid workplace up for success, please get in touch using the form linked below.

 

This article was written by LiveTiles Head of Global Communication, Paul Conneally (paul.conneally@livetilesglobal.com) following a period of extensive consultation and discussion with the LiveTiles global community of customers in May/June 2021. If you are interested to learn more about how amazing employee experience can be achieved and set your digital and hybrid workplace up for success, please get in touch and let us know how we can help.

 

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

Enabling frontline workers in construction

Blog

Enabling frontline workers in construction

In this series, we focus on industries most affected by frontline work, including, construction, retail, and healthcare, and the specific challenges they face. We’ll explore which employees are impacted most, and how companies are planning for the future of work.
Frontline construction worker

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

Over the last year, industries with frontline workers have been hit the hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic and required to pivot and adjust to support their teams and customers. Of particular significance are retail, construction, and healthcare. They have had to furlough significant chunks of their workforces, remain operational on reduced resources, and build themselves back up.

In this series, we focus on these industries and the specific challenges they are facing. We’ll explore which employees are impacted most, and how companies are planning for the future of work.

How has the construction industry evolved?

Adoption and implementation of innovative solutions have gained widespread popularity. These changing trends are redefining the way the construction industry will emerge out of the pandemic and strive to regain lost ground. The driving force behind the change, accelerated largely due to the pandemic, has been technology growth and adoption around safety, management, and monitoring, as well as driving leads.

Employees on the frontline of construction

A typical construction project spans multiple locations:

  • The site where the construction itself takes place
  • The office on that site where workers such as managers, contractors, or engineers work on a project-by-project basis
  • The headquarters of the business which may house further project managers and engineers

All of these locations must maintain continued communication so that everyone is aligned on the progress of the work. 

Each team has multiple responsibilities and must interact with each other, track safety protocols, maintain equipment, and liaise with other teams either on-site or at headquarters. And today, more than ever, innovative technology is playing a huge part in making sure workloads and processes are carried out efficiently, and internal communications are streamlined. 

The move to mobile

At the onset of the pandemic, organizations across industries realized they required frequent use of remote/mobile applications to enable business continuity. For businesses in the construction industry, the need for communication, inspection, and accountability at all stages of a project was (and still is) paramount. Of course, this isn’t a new trend. The move to mobile has been on the cards for several years.

Platforms that enhance employee engagement, collaboration, as well as inspection and asset measurement software, allows workers and management to communicate efficiently on the job, avoid delays, and improve productivity overall. Moving forward, construction companies that incorporate mobile access to stay connected will have better control over their day-to-day activities and improve their bottom line.  

Supporting frontline workers in the construction industry

A construction site is a dynamic place. People are moving around constantly and different teams need to work together to complete projects and meet strict deadlines. Because of low-profit margins, when deadlines are missed, projects (and businesses) lose money. That’s why it’s important to provide your employees with the right technology to enhance the employee experience and enable faster processes.

Here are several ways you can support your workers:

Treat the frontline like knowledge workers

It’s a given that knowledge workers are provided with cutting-edge communication tools to get their work done. The same should be the case for workers on the frontline. Providing and adapting communication tools to connect with frontline workers in the construction industry will enable better collaboration, less mistakes and faster job completion times.  

Make use of technology advancements

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies, coupled with official communication apps, will connect your frontline workers onsite with engineers back at the office. Changes to project plans can be implanted and communicated instantly, the use of more accurate data can help avoid costly delays, and digital forms can enable much faster data input.

Uniting licensed and unlicensed workforces

With unified opportunities to communicate, collaborate, and have some experience with an app or platform no matter the location, your workers can collaborate effectively and align to project requirements.

Support employee turnover

Historically, construction has seen plenty of movement across its workforce, including casual labor, seasonal workers, and so on. Your tech should be flexible and simple enough to use and easy to implement when it’s needed.

Planning for the future in construction

With President Biden’s inevitable $2.25 trillion dollar proposal, set to be pushed forward over the summer, it will become essential to more efficiently mobilize the construction industry. With infrastructure plans encompassing the likes of roads and bridges, but also the electric grid, high-speed broadband, clean water and veterans’ hospitals, etc. supporting the workforce to deliver on these projects is clearly key.

There is a need to focus on keeping workers safe on-site. The right technology solutions are already playing a big part in making this happen without compromising the productivity of a project.

  1. Monitor and track well-being: key priority for construction companies is keeping the workers safe. On average, two construction workers die of work-related injuries every day in the United States. Incorporating safety protocols into mobile apps and making it a non-negotiable part of the everyday process can help reduce accidents and protect workers.

  2. Provide ways for teams to best communicate hazards, issues: Using mobile technology to enable workers to communicate hazards and other issues when they come up is another essential way that businesses can help reduce risk on projects on-site.

 

Help drive engagement and improve the employee experience

 

The role that mobile collaboration apps will play in the future of safe and efficient construction projects seems obvious. Creating a safe environment for your staff is key to worker welfare and also enabling more efficient work practices.

 

Getting started with employee apps

 

It’s essential to use technology to improve how construction workers do their jobs. From safety to productivity, the right solution can transform how your construction business operates. And in an uncertain world where every inch counts, this is a real game-changer.

 

LiveTiles Reach is a bespoke employee experience app that is designed to improve the working life of your frontline workers. It comes complete with all the features you need to make sure all your on-site workers feel happy, safe, and productive.

 

If you want to find out more about LiveTiles Reach, or employee apps, get in touch with our team today

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

Revolutionize frontline engagement, and supercharge the employee experience

Blog

Revolutionize frontline engagement, and supercharge the employee experience

Future-proof your business, revolutionize frontline engagement, and supercharge the employee experience: LiveTiles’ latest whitepaper outlines the strategy to succeed during “business unusual”
Frontline engagement

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

COVID-19 meant big changes for business. Frontline workers, always highly valued, became truly indispensable.  

 

Frontline staff aren’t the only “deskless” workers now, with 48% of employees preferring to continue to work from home, even after the risk of COVID liftsThose staff who were fixtures of the office now won’t be there – at least not all the time. 

 

All signs suggest we will continue to work in “business unusual” for the foreseeable future. This presents an obvious challenge for businesses: how is it possible to keep all staff engaged? With workers on the frontline in industries like healthcare, mining, construction, and retail, AND staff with the popular new hybrid schedule of office and home? Workers will need to be particularly engaged. How is it possible to keep the team together? 

 

LiveTiles’ latest whitepaper will give you the insights and practical steps to tackle these communications challenges. Our latest whitepaper, “The Power of Employee Communications: From Frontline Engagement to Digital Transformation, includes statistics and insights to help senior stakeholders and practitioners create a successful employee communications strategy.    

 

This free whitepaper shows you exactly how an employee app can keep your staff connected, no matter where they work, increasing productivity and supporting their wellbeing.    

 

“The Power of Employee Communications: From Frontline Engagement to Digital Transformation” covers 

 

  1. Driving digital transformation  
  2. Future proofing for the hybrid workplace  
  3. Revolutionizing frontline engagement  
  4. Delivering the mobile-first digital workplace  
  5. Empowering the employee voice  
  6. Supercharging employee experience  

 

Learn how to future-proof your business, revolutionise frontline engagement, and supercharge the employee experience. Download the whitepaper for free today.  

 

Need more expert advice? Get in touch with our leading tech-perts at any time.     

 

DOWNLOAD THE WHITE PAPER

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

How to improve internal communications at the retail frontline

Blog

How to improve internal communications at the retail frontline

There are many trends shaping the future of work in 2021 and beyond. From new safety protocols to closely managing the employee experience, nearly all industries have been impacted in some way or another.
Women in the retail industry using an employee app

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

Frontline industries, such as retail, are confronted by specific challenges when it comes to internal communications and delivering employee experiences. These workers are not in front of a desktop all day – for the majority in retail, they will not be at a desk at all. For this reason, mobility is the key to boosting employee engagement in internal communications.

 

Frontline workers can be also known as “firstline workers” because they’re so often the first point of contact to the wider world. In retail, they are on their feet all day, either largely on the move or in near-constant interaction with customers. How do we bring the same conveniences to retail workers that employees sitting at a desk in an office have every day? What’s more, how do we achieve this in the current climate, in an industry where the impact of disruption from COVID-19 has been huge.

 

Here we are going to focus on retail, exploring how retail leaders are driving forward with digital transformation to improve the effectiveness of internal communications.

 

After the storm

 

As society opens up after lockdown and stay-at-home orders, there’s growing concern over critical factors like employee safety and morale, supply chain stress, and inventory management. Internal communications has a crucial role to play in guiding employees back to work and addressing these concerns.

 

But not every retail organization has been affected the same. Some retailers have only been partially disrupted. These businesses are still able to open stores but with reduced business hours, for instance. Others have been more severely disrupted, perhaps only allowed to offer takeout or home delivery for the time being, but they have managed to keep the business operating. Others have been existentially disrupted. These businesses are struggling for survival and have perhaps had to close down stores for good, shifting entirely to e-commerce.

 

This is just to show that it is not a simple, one-solution-fits-all scenario. And to highlight the important fact that some frontline workers are not currently on the front line. Organizations have to keep furloughed workers in the loop and engaged in the company culture just as much as other employees (perhaps more so), until everyone can be welcomed safely back on-site.

 

Part of a bigger picture

 

It’s also important to note that the retail sector had been facing ongoing disruption for the last decade. As customer behavior has shifted from in-store to online purchases, and with the dominance of Amazon and other e-commerce outfits, traditional retailers have had their fair share of challenges to face for a while. Digital transformation was already understood to be necessary, but for various reasons hadn’t been taken up with the same urgency that is now being demanded of it.

 

The value of internal communications in retail

 

So, what kind of investment should be made in communication tools? How can we improve engagement in internal communications, deliver modern employee experiences, and help accommodate for the concerns employees have of returning back to the frontline?

 

One of the first challenges is the variety of work in retail. To bring everyone together and create unified employee experiences can be a challenge. You need to cater for cashiers, managers, floor workers, transportation, and furloughed staff.

 

It’s important to consider:

 

  • What does a day in the life look like for these roles?
  • What are their responsibilities?
  • How do they connect with other staff members and how do they interact with customers?
  • How do they currently use corporate comms tools?
  • Are they engaged in these tools?
  • What is user adoption like?

 

When you have a better picture about these, you will be able to start planning what kind of tool you need. And all of these needs must be reflected in your digital transformation strategy. But there are a few things that are essential across the board:

 

  • Staff need the ability to easily connect with the team and if they have a problem on the floor – whether it is about a current sale, an out-of-stock product, or about COVID-19 guidelines – they need to be able to find an answer quick.
  • If you are asking your employees to deliver consistent quality throughout the customer experience, then you need to give them consistent user experiences when it comes to the tools they use on the job.
  • Employee apps need to be customizable in terms of branding, so that everyone feels part of the company. It also needs to have a modern look and feel, closely modelled on the consumer apps that employees use at home.
  • No matter what happens, employees will need to feel appreciated, connected, and looked after. And access to resources such as HR, mental health support, safety guidelines etc. are crucial in the current climate.

 

This is a good starting point for developing the communications apps your frontline workers deserve. But there’s much more to discover. We recently hosted a webinar on this topic which explored how retail organizations can overcome the challenges they face in 2021. If you are interested in taking a more in-depth deep dive than we were able to do here, Addressing Business Unusual in Retail Today can be watched on-demand now.

 

Better employee experiences with LiveTiles

 

From new safety protocols to now having to closely manage the employee experience, nearly all industries have been impacted by the pandemic in some form. Still, those with frontline workers, like retail, have been hit the hardest. So, when it comes to supporting frontline retail workers, there are more challenges than ever.

 

However, there are many opportunities too, such as a newfound urgency to digitally transform operations. Many retail organizations are truly beginning to understand the value of digital communication tools, and that working towards getting better engagement and improving employee experiences is the key to success.

 

At LiveTiles, we work closely with retail organizations to discover the right technology solution for them. We can empower your workforce by providing employee apps that connect and support retail workers on the frontline, improving internal communications, and providing the mobility required for the future of work.

 

To learn more about delivering the best employee engagement and employee experiences for frontline workers in retail, get in touch with the team at LiveTiles today.

In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.
In today’s work environment, rapid change is a constant reality.

Read more

Tailoring your employee onboarding experience for your hybrid or remote workplace

Blog

Tailoring your employee onboarding experience for your hybrid or remote workplace

Hybrid and Remote workplaces are here to stay. 2020 saw tens of millions of employees in the US forced into full-time remote work, and for others, in-office work was severely restricted for health and safety.
Hybrid onboarding

Employee Experience Pulse Check

Download your free copy now

While there is variation across industries and occupations, the trend for remote work is expected to continue especially for professional and office workers. In fact, a survey by the Conference Board uncovered that a third of companies expected 40% or more of their employees to work primarily remotely moving forward. 

Now, we’re more ore than a year into the pandemic and with vaccines becoming more readily available – WFH  still not taken away the anxiety many workers have around returned to the in-person working. In fact,  a recent study by the American Psychological Association shows almost half (49%) of employees feel uneasy about returning to in-person interactions. 

However, as many workforce surveys show, there is still desire from many to have the option to come to a physical workplace/office and reap the benefits it has for team collaboration, morale, and mental health. This kind of hybrid working arrangement offers many benefits to employers and employees. 

As workplaces continue to evolve with the changing conditions, the need to effectively onboard new hires has not gone away. This blog explores the impact of effective employee onboarding, strategies, and processes for onboarding remote and hybrid employees, along with how digital workplace technologies can contribute to a smooth onboarding experience. 

Importance of an effective onboarding program 

We all know that first im